BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Breakfast with Frost  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Breakfast with Frost
On Sunday 29 June, 2003, Breakfast with Frost featured interviews with Paul Bremer, the US official in charge of post-war Iraq and the Health Secretary, John Reid MP

Paul Bremer - the US official in charge of post-war Iraq
Warned that coalition forces are likely to suffer more attacks

The programme featured an interview with Paul Bremer, the US official in charge of post-war Iraq, who warned that coalition forces are likely to suffer more attacks of the kind last week, in which six British military policemen died.

But he said allied troops would hunt down those responsible.

"They are still fighting us and we are going to fight them and impose our will on them and we will capture or, if necessary, kill them until we have imposed law and order on this country," Mr Bremer told Peter Sissons.

"Unfortunately we will continue to take casualties, such as the tragic attack against the British forces, but there is no strategic threat to the coalition."

Mr Bremer rejected claims that Washington had no strategy for re-building Iraq in the aftermath of the conflict.

"It is not easy to take a country where there has been 30 years of economic mismanagement and political tyranny and turn it around," he said.

"We are only nine weeks after the end of the war and we have made a lot of progress," he said.

"There is lot of good news that tends to get lost in the noise here," he added, although he admitted that there was still much to do.

Aid workers disagree

Two aid workers just back from Iraq interviewed on the programme gave a more pessimistic assessment of the situation.

Dominic Nutt, of Christian Aid, described some of Mr Bremer's assertions as "unmitigated nonsense".

Mr Nutt said the security situation in Iraq was "deteriorating day by day".

John Reid defends intelligence dossiers

Health Secretary, John Reid MP
Does the BBC believe the allegations to be true?

Also, the programme featured an interview with the new Health Secretary, John Reid MP, who talked about the challenges facing the NHS, and about the row between the government and the BBC over reports that the Prime Minister's official spokesman ordered intelligence dossiers on Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction to be "sexed up".

"They [the BBC] said the Prime Minister and his staff put information in to the public domain they knew to be wrong, they did it against the wishes of the intelligence services in this country and they did it to dupe the people of this country," Mr Reid insisted.

"This is completely untrue," he said. "They have been denied by all the heads of the intelligence services as well as the Prime Minster and what we need from the BBC is a simple statement. Do they believe these allegations to be true?"

Dr Reid added: "If they say 'well now, actually we are reporting them but we don't ourselves believe them to be true' fine."

Sir Bill Morris on New Labour

Also on the programme, the outgoing leader of one of Britain's biggest unions called for an official review of links between the union movement and the Labour Party.

"There should be a joint commission of, say, the Labour Party and the trade unions chaired by a neutral person to look at the relationship for the 21st Century," said Sir Bill Morris, who retires this summer as General Secretary of the TGWU.

But he said the relationship should not be one of "money for policy":

"The fact of the matter is when business tried to buy policy for money we say it is political corruption. And if it is wrong for business then surely it must be wrong for trade unions.

"Ours is a relationship built on common values, shared tradition and shared history and it is to enhance the opportunity for working people to have a better life that is what we are in business for."

High hopes

He said he was not disappointed in New Labour but had higher hopes for the future.

"What it now has to do is look to see how it can renew its own thoughts and ideas for the third term. For far too long in the second term the Government has operated in a sort of ideological free zone.

"I think they need to abandon the sort of 'what works' philosophy of the third way and move ourselves on."

The programme also featured an interview with Lucy Rusedski and the newspapers were reviewed by the novelist Barbara Taylor Bradford and the editor of the Financial Times, Andrew Gowers.


Send us your comments:

Name:


Your E-mail address:


Country:


Comments:


Disclaimer: The BBC will put up as many of your comments as possible but we cannot guarantee that all e-mails will be published. The BBC reserves the right to edit comments that are published.

Frost home
Latest programme
Past programmes
Suggest a guest
About the show

 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Breakfast with Frost stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes