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Breakfast with Frost
On Sunday, 15 June, 2003, Breakfast with Frost featured the new Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs, Lord Falconer.

The newspapers were reviewed by the actor Richard Briers, Lord Hattersley and the foreign editor of The Times, Bronwen Maddox
Newspapers reviewed by Richard Briers, Lord Hattersley and Bronwen Maddox
Lord Falconer told Sir David Frost that people should focus on the "substance" of last week's reshuffle, rather than the political row over the changes.

He insisted that abolishing the post of Lord Chancellor and establishing a Supreme Court was "a fundamental reform of the legal system" which had been "very, very, necessary".

Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs, Lord Falconer
"A fundamental reform of the legal system"
Lord Falconer also gave an explanation of the division of responsibilities between ministers, on Scotland and Wales.

He said the Scotland and Wales offices still existed, but their officials were now based in his new department, with Transport Secretary Alistair Darling and the Leader of the Commons, Peter Hain in charge of them "politically".

PM no longer in charge of cabinet

But the Shadow Deputy Prime Minister, David Davis accused the Prime Minister of "cavalier disregard for our constitution".

"This constitutional reform which we're facing now, which will take three years, is a complete by-product of the internal battles of his Cabinet." He claimed that Tony Blair "no longer controls his Cabinet fully".

Among the changes to the middle ranks of the government, the former Education Secretary Estelle Morris was appointed to be Arts Minister. She admitted to Sir David that she was "more likely to be seen at the cinema or an art gallery than the ballet or the opera".

But she said she was "rested and refreshed" after eight months out of government, and looking forward to learning about all aspects of her culture brief.

Alan Milburn's actions 'understood'

"I don't bring to it what I brought to education which was ... a knowledge of what it was like to deliver the service, but I am a citizen, I am a person and we've all got that side of use that needs the arts or creativity."

Ms Morris said she completely understood the "very brave" decision of Alan Milburn to step down as health secretary - and said she herself had no ambition to be promoted to the Cabinet again.

But she said, "All politicians are tempted by being given the chance to make a difference. So on a lesser scale and in a narrower field I hope that's what I can do over the next few months."

The programme also included an interview with Latif Yahia - an Iraqi, now living in Britain, who was forced to work for three years as a "double" for Saddam Hussein's eldest son, Uday.

The newspapers were reviewed by the actor Richard Briers, Lord Hattersley and the foreign editor of The Times, Bronwen Maddox.


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