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Breakfast with Frost
Chancellor Gordon Brown
Chancellor Gordon Brown
On Sunday March 16 Sir David talked to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown and to the Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar.

He also interviewed the United Nations Under-Secretary General Shashi Tharoor and the Conservative Shadow Foreign Secretary Michael Ancram. The Green MEP, Caroline Lucas and Dan Yergin, Chairman of Cambridge Energy Research Associates discussed the importance of oil in the crisis on Iraq.

The Sunday newspapers were reviewed by the Political Editor of the New Statesman, John Kampfner and the columnist Mary Riddell.

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Gordon Brown told Sir David that the Government was satisfied that war on Iraq would be legal without a second resolution.

Click on the highlighted links to read the full transcripts.

Mr Aznar agreed, he told Sir David: "A further resolution would be politically desirable ... but from a legal point of view it is not indispensable.

"We have done everything in our power to reach a consensus on the United Nations Security Council. Resolution 1441 gave a last opportunity to comply with the disarmament conditions.

"In my opinion, legally acting under the 7th chapter of the (UN) charter and taking into consideration all resolutions from the 687 to the 1441, there is a possibility for going to war if necessary.

"We are doing and we have done everything in our power to reach a peaceful solution to the crisis on the basis of fulfilment of disarmament requirements.

"The last chance for this lies in Saddam's hands. He can avoid the serious consequences which he might be facing in the face of non-fulfilment."

Gordon Brown said: "My view is, and I think this is the view of Tony Blair, is that we should continue to try, even now, even in these difficult times, to secure international agreement, international agreement to a resolution that would involve international cooperation and force Saddam Hussein to disarm.

"That was the purpose of having a second resolution."

But Shashi Tharoor said: "The only expert opinion that counts is that of the Security Council collectively, because it's a long standing principle of the United Nations that the Security Council is the master of its own interpretations.

"This whole exercise has been one of the council trying to find unity around deciding how to implement 1441 and the preceding resolutions. That seems to me to be the real issue here today.

"The (UN) charter envisages very very clear bases for legal action to enforce its own resolutions.

"Normally that means a Security Council resolution explicitly authorising that sort of action."


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