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Breakfast with Frost
John Prescott MP, deputy prime minister
John Prescott MP, deputy prime minister
On Sunday, 9 March, Sir David talked to the Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott and to the Foreign Minister of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Jassem bin Jabr Al Thani.

He interviewed the yachtswoman Ellen MacArthur, the Chairman of the Government's Pensions Commission Adair Turner, the England cricketer Ronnie Irani and the Chief Executitve of the England and Wales Cricket Board Tim Lamb. He also talked to Dr Zalmay Khalilzad, the US envoy to the Iraqi opposition.

The Sunday newspapers were reviewed by Claire Rayner and the Tory candidate for Mayor of London Steve Norris.

Tell us what you think about the programme by using the form at the bottom of the page.

Sir David asked John Prescott about the threat by a number of government aides to reisgn over the crisis on Iraq and whether or not the crisis was threatening Tony Blair's leadership.

The Deputy Prime Minister told him:"Tony is putting his case, putting it very very strongly and I think the people recognise an honest man who is making a case for peace and security.

"I have been a PPS, I think I ended up resigning because I had a disagreement. You can resign, I don't know whether you have to make public statements with it, but that is up to them."

Asked by Sir David whether Mr Blair's premiership was safe whatever happened, Mr Prescott said: "I would say so, but that is a matter for the party. I don't think there is any doubt about it whatsoever.

"Tony Blair is giving leadership, that is what this party wants from Tony Blair, and we will go on seeking to get that second resolution at the UN which we are fighting very hard for and then of course Parliament will perhaps want to make a point of view on a vote on that."

Click on the highlighted links to read the full transcripts.

Tim Lamb, Chief Executive of the ECB told Sir David that he had no regrets over the decision not to boycott the Zimbabwe game.

"The ECB management board met earlier in the week and went through the sequence of events and the general consensus was that it was difficult to see how we could have done anything different.

"It was a blow that we didn't get through to the Super Sixes - we should have beaten Australia and clearly losing the points from a match we were expected to win (in Zimbabwe) ruined our chances in the World Cup."

He admitted he was expecting to fight a hefty compensation claim from the International Cricket Board's commercial partners, the Global Cricket Corporation.

But he added: "We believe we have a strong legal case and we will defend that - but it remains to be seen what sort of damages are claimed."


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