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Breakfast with Frost
Colin Powell
Colin Powell
BBC BREAKFAST WITH FROST
HOSTED BY SUE MACGREGOR
INTERVIEW:
COLIN POWELL
SEPTEMBER 1ST, 2002

Please note "BBC Breakfast with Frost" must be credited if any part of this transcript is used

SUE MACGREGOR:
But first a special look ahead to Breakfast with Frost next week, the connected item, you can see an interview with the American Secretary of State Colin Powell to mark the anniversary of the September the 11th attacks. In this extract David Frost first asks Colin Powell when he realised that the attacks meant that the whole world had changed?

COLIN POWELL:
Once I heard that the towers had actually collapsed and realised what this must have been like and how many people were probably in those towers and the numbers were in the thousands immediately, the initial estimates has to be thousands, yeah. I realised that this was not just an attack against the United States, it was an attack against the civilised world, it was an attack against the whole world which it turned out to be. I mean over 90 nations lost people in those two towers and then we realised that they were also attacking the Pentagon, had attacked the Pentagon and that fourth plane that crashed in a field in Pennsylvania might have been heading to the White House or might have been heading to my own department, the State Department, it might have been heading right to this building that we're sitting in here today.

DAVID FROST:
In terms of turning the war on terrorism up to date and the phrase that's been used all year, the next step and the question mark being Iraq obviously, are you still hopeful of getting weapons inspectors back into Iraq?

COLIN POWELL:
The President has been clear that he believes weapon's inspectors should return, Iraq has been in violation of these many UN resolutions for most of the last 11 or so years and so as a first step let's see what the inspectors find, send them back in, why are they being kept out? Now we should not think that the inspections in and of themselves might give us the kind of assurance that we could take to the bank but the President has said why won't they let the inspectors in and the President has also said that it is the obligation not just of the United States but the entire international community to be remain seized of this matter.

DAVID FROST:
Whereas we were all Americans after 9/11, now we have a situation where, yes Saddam Hussein is, is a threat to peace and so on, but nobody seems to agree with America that he's that much of a threat?

COLIN POWELL:
I think that the world has to be presented with the information, with the intelligence that's available, a debate is needed within the international community so that everybody can make a judgement about this. I think in the current debate too much attention has focused on the position of the United States of what debate is taking place within our administration as opposed to attention being focused on the Iraqi regime.

SUE MACGREGOR:
And the full interview with Colin Powell and David will be broadcast on this programme next Sunday.

END
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