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Danny Naveh, Israeli cabinet minister
Danny Naveh, Israeli cabinet minister
BBC BREAKFAST WITH FROST INTERVIEW: DANNY NAVEH Israeli Cabinet Minister MAY 5th, 2002

Please note "BBC Breakfast with Frost" must be credited if any part of this transcript is used

DAVID FROST: And now we're joined from Jerusalem by the minister without portfolio, Danny Naveh, a member also of Ariel Sharon's Likud Party. Mr Naveh, good morning.

DANNY NAVEH: Good morning, it's a pleasure to be on your show.

DAVID FROST: Thank you very much, we're delighted to have you. Were you able to hear what Mr Roed-Larsen was saying there?

DANNY NAVEH: Yes I've just, I've heard most of his statements, yes.

DAVID FROST: And what comment do you have on what he said?

DANNY NAVEH: Look, first of all the only massacre that took place in our area during the last year and a half is the terrible murder of more than 400 Israelis by Arafat's terrorists. There was no massacre in Jenin and the claims against Israel in this case are close to a, to a blood libel. Unfortunately the main problem is that the UN people are biased. We have just heard Mr Larsen - and Mr Larsen convicted Israel before the facts were checked out and before they really looked seriously at the matter. And this is why although we have nothing to hide, such kind of a UN team is not the right thing to expose the truth.

DAVID FROST: And in terms of - you mentioned the terrible figure of 400 Israelis who died but the figure is well over a thousand Palestinians have died - much worse.

DANNY NAVEH: Well unfortunately many innocent people were killed in the last year and a half as a result of Arafat's decision to move ahead with violence. We had to fight back against Palestinian terrorists that in many, many cases they used women and children as human shield against our soldiers. And unfortunately many Palestinians innocent were killed as well as a result of that terrible policy of Arafat and his men. Our prime minister is going to Washington in order to promote peace and he is taking with him a special report that I prepared for him that has clear cut hard evidence that Arafat personally is involved in directing and enhancing terrorist activities recently in our area.

DAVID FROST: But at the same time Mr Arafat has, surprisingly, still called Mr Sharon a partner for peace. I mean is Mr Sharon ever going to negotiate with the Palestinian Authority represented by Yasser Arafat?

DANNY NAVEH: The problem is that it is not our decision that Arafat is not part of the peace. The main problem is that Arafat turned his back on peace and decided to move ahead with his campaign of violence. Arafat himself is the commander of the... brigade of the Fatah terrorists that killed so many innocent Israelis only about ten days ago. Five year old girl in Israel was shot in her bed by these terrorists. The problem is that Arafat took the decision that he is not interested in putting an end to the conflict and he is interested in terror instead of peace.

DAVID FROST: Thank you very much for joining us this morning. One last point though, a lot of people say of course that it was not Arafat and the Palestinians who started the recent violence but in fact it was Ariel Sharon's visit to Temple Mount. We should say a lot of people believe that.

DANNY NAVEH: I can tell you that, you know, there was a special committee headed by Senator George Mitchell from the United States that really decided that this is absolutely not true and that Arafat took the decision to start his campaign of violence after he was offered far-fetched proposals around the table by our previous prime minister, Ehud Barak. He could have been right now, as we speak, the president of the Palestinian state, almost with June 4 '67 borders, including part of Jerusalem, and he still decided to say no to the possibility to end the conflict.

DAVID FROST: Thank you Mr Naveh very much for joining us.

DANNY NAVEH: It was a pleasure.

INTERVIEW ENDS


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