BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  Audio/Video: Programmes: Breakfast with Frost
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Programmes 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
banner
Morgan Tsvangirai, leader, MDC
Morgan Tsvangirai, leader, MDC
BBC BREAKFAST WITH FROST INTERVIEW: MORGAN TSVANGIRAI LEADER, MDC FEBRUARY 24TH, 2002

Please note "BBC Breakfast with Frost" must be credited if any part of this transcript is used

DAVID FROST (linking from correspondent): Opinion polls have suggested however, that even with a modicum of fairness, the leader of the Movement for Democratic Change, Morgan Tsvangirai, could win a majority of votes in the presidential elections. When we spoke to him earlier, we asked first about the campaign, and how difficult it's been, with the government restrictions, and mob violence.

MORGAN TSVANGIRAI: Well, the character of our elections has always been violent, and I think its quite widespread, in the rural areas; there are sporadic indiscriminate attacks in urban areas, but with the presence of international observers from South Africa, there has been some improvement although there are still isolated incidents.

The E.U. sanctions have come a little late. I would have been happier with these E.U. sanctions having been implemented about six months ago - the targeted sanctions, that is. But I think that the impact of withdrawal of the E.U. Monitors has actually made the election illegitimate already which sends a very strong signal to Mugabe and his colleagues that the international community will not accept any other result but the result that will reflect the will of the people of Zimbabwe.

DAVID FROST: Well, we then asked whether he thought Zimbabwe should be expelled from the Commonwealth.

MORGAN TSVANGIRAI: At this stage it will have to depend on a number of investigations, but I think that Zimbabwe is certainly in a position in which its registration in the Commonwealth is totally out of context with the values of the Commonwealth.

So, as far as expelling is concerned, I think it will have to go through a number of processes, including of course having to see how the elections go, and how Mugabe reaches, or carries out an election process that is in line with the Commonwealth standard. I think the Commonwealth has a moral obligation to have taken a much tougher stance, but they seem to have been hoodwinked into believing that Mugabe somehow will listen to the voice of reason because they did not doubt that he was somebody who was committed to Commonwealth values.

I work on the basis of a victory, but also you must take into consideration the possibilities of a loss. But to me it will not be a loss, it will be an election that has been rigged. I think that we are still committed to a non-violent peoples struggle, and that hopefully the people themselves will of course, not accept that that the result is legitimate.

(END)


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Breakfast with Frost stories