BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Breakfast  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Breakfast Thursday, 15 May, 2003, 09:59 GMT 10:59 UK
Our tips on dealing with SATs stress
graphic of pen and paper test
Many adults have bad memories of exams - and it's difficult not to pass that atmosphere of panic on to our children.

The key to helping your child to survive the SATs is not to stress him out.

  • If your child is only seven, he may not be aware he's being tested at all. Most schools try to keep the atmosphere light - so don't go into overdrive on the subject at home.

  • Make sure your child gets enough sleep, so they don't let themselves down on the day. Go easy on fizzy cola-type drinks which can keep them awake.

  • Allow children to carry on with normal activities such as playing with friends or going to the park. Everyone needs a bit of rest and relaxation.

  • Remember that SATs are intended to help teachers, not to catch children out. The idea is to show what your child has learned well and identify any gaps in teaching.

    Who takes SATS?

    School attainment tests are taken at the end of each year by all pupils in state primary schools - but it's the ones at age 7 and 11 which really matter.

    Key Stage One:

    Six and seven year olds take SATs at the end of year two, which measure their progress in the first two formal years of schooling (excluding the Reception year).

    An average child is expected to hit Level Two by the end of Year Two, but some will still be working towards that level. Some six and seven year olds may get a Level Three, which means they're ahead of expectations.

    Parents will be told what level their child has reached - but the results of these tests are not published formally

    Key Stage Two

    The results of these tests form the basis of the primary school league tables which we hear so much about.

    An average child is expected to reach Level Four by the end of his or her primary education.

    By law, schools in England have to publish the percentage of pupils which do so - and these figures form the basis of the school league tables.

    Again, there is a wide variation in performance between children at Key Stage Two. Some may still be on level 3; others may get to level 5 in subjects where they have a special talent.


  • Home
    When we are on air
    Recent forums
    Programme archive
    Studio tour
    Today's information
    MEET THE TEAM
    Presenters
    Reporters
    YOUR SAY
    Contact us
    Your comments

     E-mail this story to a friend

    Links to more Breakfast stories

    © BBC ^^ Back to top

    News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
    South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
    Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
    Programmes