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Breakfast Wednesday, 18 June, 2003, 05:06 GMT 06:06 UK
Hitchcock Blonde
West End play Hitchcock Blonde
Exploring Hitchcock from three different perspectives
Be prepared to travel through time if you see Terry Johnson's critically acclaimed play Hitchcock Blonde.

Starring Rosamund Pike and William Hootkins, the play shifts between 1919, 1959 and 1999; it's been described as dark and deep, and touches on the relationships of dysfunctional men and younger women.

  • We talked to them live on this morning's programme


    The play is about the search for the true Hitchcock, and the three plots interweave: In 1999 we see a middle aged university lecturer luring a student to a Greek island to restore a lost Hitchcock film.

    Go back in time to 1959 and we see Hitchcock himself scrutinising Janet Leigh's body double (played by Pike) in Psycho.

    Eventually the plot takes the audience to 1919 and a recreation of a lost Hitchcock film that explores the film maker's obsession with Blonde women.

    Along the way, the complex plot takes in diverse themes including relationships, hilarious observations on the fifty-something generation, as well as dodgy tourists and snobbery in the British film Industry.

    Rosamund Pike

    It was Pike's role as Bond girl Miranda Frost in Die Another Day that undoubtedly raised the actresses profile.

    As a result, she was inundated with requests for photo shoots and had top designers like Armani and Gucci queuing up to supply her with outfits.

    She won best newcomer at the Empire film awards in February and shortly after was signed up to do Hitchcock Blonde at the Royal Court theatre where the stage production started out.

    It's proved to be a demanding role in which have tested her acting skills - the play involves full nudity, murder and in one scene she has to carry a 12 stone man on stage.

    In one interview for a newspaper, she talked about her character in Hitchcock Blonde.

    "My character is a small-town dreamer," she explains. "And those dreams are ones everybody shares, that you can be rescued from wherever you've ended up."

    She goes on to say how her character meets Prince Charming in the form of a famous director but how he turns out to be a toad.

    William Hootkins

    Attended St. Marks, where he was a member of the same theatre group as 'Tommy Lee' Jones.

    He's done lots of theatre including Insignificance, The Dentist, The Watergate Tapes for the Royal Court and Orpheus Descending (Donmar).

    His television work includes The Young Indiana Jones, Poirot, Cagney & Lacey, Taxi, Blackadder as well as 70s and 80s classics Bergerac, and Tales of the Unexpected.

  • Hitchcock Blonde, at the Lyric Theatre London, from 25 June
  •  WATCH/LISTEN
     ON THIS STORY
    Hitchcock Blonde
    Actors Rosamund Pike and William Hootkins
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