BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Breakfast  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Breakfast Thursday, 1 May, 2003, 05:13 GMT 06:13 UK
Ethics and League Tables
Breakfast's series Chasing Places
League tables widen the gap, says Mr Perry
If you've been watching this week's special series of reports on schools, you're probably aware of the intense competition to get your child into "the best" local school.
Rev Simon Perry
Perry: support your local school

Some parents are ruthless in their pursuit of a place in a school at the top of the league tables and will accept nothing else.

But does this actually make the schools lower down the league tables doomed to fail?

  • We talked to one viewer, the Rev Simon Perry.

    He e-mailed us to say he's sending his son to an unpopular local school because he feels he has a duty to the community to help make it work.

    And, we talked to the editor of the Good Schools Guide, Ralph Lucas


    We also asked for your views.

    Simon Perry lives in Taunton and contacted Breakfast about his son's primary school place.

    If parents are selfish enough to think can leap-frog over other families to get their kids into the 'best' school, their children will grow up to be equally selfish.

    He's decided to send him to a school which doesn't have a good reputation among local parents because he thinks it's important to give the school a chance.

    He says he doesn't give much credence to league tables: the obsession with sending children to the top-performing schools only widens the gap.

    He says "What is wrong with people in this country - who think so little of their children that they think school has all the answers?

    "Children learn far more from their own parents than their parents usually realise. And if their parents are selfish enough to think can leap-frog over other families to get their kids into the 'best' school, their children will grow up to be equally selfish."

    Send us your stories

    E-mail us atbreakfasttv@bbc.co.uk

    Send us your comments:
    Name:

    Your E-mail Address:

    Town/City:

    Commenting on:

    Comments:

  •  WATCH/LISTEN
     ON THIS STORY
    Ethics and League Tables
    Breakfast debates the issues, with Rev Simon Perry and Ralph Lucas
    Home
    When we are on air
    Recent forums
    Programme archive
    Studio tour
    Today's information
    MEET THE TEAM
    Presenters
    Reporters
    YOUR SAY
    Contact us
    Your comments
    See also:

    29 Apr 03 | Breakfast
    28 Apr 03 | Breakfast
    30 Apr 03 | Breakfast
    Internet links:


    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


     E-mail this story to a friend

    Links to more Breakfast stories

    © BBC ^^ Back to top

    News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
    South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
    Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
    Programmes