BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Breakfast  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Breakfast Monday, 2 June, 2003, 08:08 GMT 09:08 UK
GM crops - the nation decides
Do you eat GM food?
Protestors at a GM crop trial site

A national debate on genetically modified products is about to begin.

The six-week long "GM Nation" debate will take the form of a series of meetings around the country and is being organised by the government.

The result could change the face of British food production forever.

But a group of organisations, including the Consumers Association and the National Trust have written to the government to raise concerns over the way the debate is being run.

They are concerned that the results of the latest trials on GM foods will not be made available until the debates are over.

The results of the three year field trials are not published until September - but the debating period is due to end at the end of July.

Sheila McKechnie of the Consumers' Association says her organisation is not pro or anti GM foods - but they want the public to have as much information as possible before reaching a decision.

The public will want to know what the evidence is before they take a view

Sheila McKechnie, Consumers' Association

The government says it will take a very close look at the results of the national debate, before it takes a decision on whether Britain should produce GM foods.

Breakfast reporter Yvonne Ndege has been to the US to look at their attitudes to GM food.

In America, consumers have embraced the technology and do not think twice about buying food with GM ingredients.


The view from America is that GM crops not only enable farmers to be more productive, but that they also help to protect the environment, as farmers are able to use fewer chemicals to produce their crops.

Scientists in the States are now working on a new generation of GM crops, such as a tomato that helps with pneumonia and potatoes that do not absorb fat.

Tomorrow, Yvonne will be reporting from the West Country, on the opposition to GM crops

Home
When we are on air
Recent forums
Programme archive
Studio tour
Today's information
MEET THE TEAM
Presenters
Reporters
YOUR SAY
Contact us
Your comments

 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Breakfast stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes