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Breakfast Friday, 30 May, 2003, 09:49 GMT 10:49 UK
Yolanda King
Yolanda King
Yolanda will collect an award dedicated to her father
The civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King Junior is remembered for giving probably the most famous ever speech in 1963.

It was on the 28 August when more than 250'000 protesters gathered in Washington, D.C.

It was on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that King delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

  • Yolanda King was live on Breakfast, you can see her interview by clicking on the link at the bottom of the page

    As a result King's renown continued to grow as he became Time magazine's Man of the Year in 1963 and the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

    However, along with the fame and accolades came conflict within the movement's leadership.

    Yolanda King is in the UK to pick up the 'Legacy' honour award for her later father at the Ethnic Multicultural Media Awards (EMMAs).

    The hosts of tonight's awards are Trevor Nelson and Connie Huq (from Blue Peter) and special guest will be Iain Duncan Smith.

    Yolanda spoke about the other side of her father that the public never saw.

    She said the children were never spanked and her memories were full of love and laughter, but at home he was able to let his hair down.

    She said she was very proud when her father made the speech and her parents explained what it meant - Yolanda was seven at the time.

    The EMMA award shows that 35 years after his assassination his spirit is alive and well and continuing to inspire people and motivate change and hope.

    On how the world has changed, she said it's a different place and blatant discrimination no longer exists - barriers have been removed.

    She said her work in the arts can help to educate and inspire people to take a look at things, and she had not set out on a career as a civil rights campaigner.


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