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EDITIONS
Breakfast Tuesday, 22 October, 2002, 12:45 GMT 13:45 UK
What drives us?

In a major new series for BBC ONE, Professor Robert Winston provides a unique insight into what it is that makes us human.

"Human Instinct" is the story of our extraordinary instincts and why we behave the way we do.

Do you find yourself wondering what drives us? Why does winning feel so good and losing so bad? Click here to e-mail us.

Professor Winston has travelled the globe in his quest to unravel the complex mystery of our instinctive behaviour.

He discovers what other animals reveal about our most basic drives.

With intriguing experiments and secret filming he uncovers the surprising science of sex. And helps us understand why one human being could lay down their life for another.

In exploring survival, sex, competition and self-sacrifice, Professor Winston takes viewers on a journey of discovery into human behaviour, to look at ourselves in an entirely new way.

"Human Instinct" is the story of how instincts have made us humans into the uniquely successful species that we are, despite us not always being aware of them.

  • Human Instinct begins tonight on BBC One at 2100 BST

    Human Instinct by Professor Robert Winston is published by Transworld Publishers. ISBN: 0593 05 024 X

    Professor Winston says making this programme has widened his outlook as a scientist. But he wonders what other scientists will make of it. He believes the series is not science for scientists - it is about trying to translate complex ideas into something easily accessible for all. He thinks the whole area of evolutionary psychology has been largely overlooked but thinks it's fascinating. According to Winston we all carry a prehistoric baggage around with us and don't have full control over it.

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