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Breakfast Friday, 11 October, 2002, 07:43 GMT 08:43 UK
Expelled boys: their side of the story
A school in Surrey has been told it can't expel two fifteen year old boys who made death threats against one of their teachers.

The Glyn Technology School in Epsom has been orderd to take the teenagers back, after a hearing in front of an independent appeals panel.

We asked you for your views - and nearly all of them were highly critical.

Then, we interviewed the mother of one of the boys involved. Find out whether what she had to say changes your view of the case

Sue Aldred, live on Breakfast
Sue is worried about her son's education
For legal reasons, the boys in the case must remain anonymous.

But one of the parents involved - Sue Aldred - has a different name from her son and agreed to be interviewed on camera and on the record.

"No, it's not normal behaviour," she admitted on Breakfast this morning. "But the boys have said they were sorry and made written apologies."

She added: "My son is not a threatening boy. He is not a yob - he's not a violent boy.

"If I thought that he might harm anyone I would not be taking this course of action."

She is worried about her son's educational prospects: this is his exam year and he has been out of school for the past five months. "My sympathies are with the teacher," she said :"but five months' punishment is long enough."

If the boys cannot return to their original school, they face going to a "pupil referral unit." Sometimes known as "sin-bins", these units take the most difficult and troublesome youngsters from schools across a wide area.


Staff at Glyn Technology School in Epsom, Surrey, have been voting on whether to continue to refuse to teach the boys.

The result of the ballot is expected on Friday, or early next week.

The pair were expelled from the school in June after making abusive phone calls to PE teacher Steve Taverner, who is off work due to stress.

They apparently turned on Mr Taverner after he disciplined them for throwing stones at windows.

In one call intercepted by police the boys said: "You have five days to live".

Another allegedly said: "You are going to die soon. You are going to get stabbed in the back of the head."

The boys returned to school this month - but teachers have refused to teach them.

They have been educated apart from other pupils by a supply teacher.

The incident has turned the spotlight again on the powers schools have to exclude pupils. Glyn Technology School's head teacher, Stuart Turner, said: "Expulsion is an act of last resort and a school never takes such a decision lightly, but we must be able to make schools a safe place for everyone.

To have your say, e-mail us at breakfasttv@bbc.co.uk

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See also:

10 Oct 02 | Education
10 Oct 02 | Education
04 May 01 | Education
16 Jan 02 | Education
16 Jan 02 | Mike Baker
16 Jan 02 | England
16 Nov 01 | Education
25 Aug 00 | Education
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