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Breakfast Monday, 2 September, 2002, 08:54 GMT 09:54 UK
Jeremy Bowen: under the spotlight
watch our Online Forum and read Jeremy's personal account of his time with us
scroll down to read Jeremy's personal account of two years on Breakfast
After two years presenting Breakfast, the BBC's finally allowing Jeremy Bowen to have a lie-in. His last day as a Breakfast presenter will be Thursday September 5, when we'll be looking back at some of the highlights of his time with us

We have already put some of your questions to him, in a special on-line forum.


Jeremy has also written a special farewell piece for us:

The biggest story in the last two years was, of course, September 11th 2001.

As soon as planes were flying again to North America ( we could only get to Montreal and had to drive down to New York), I went out with a team from Breakfast to present the programme.


It felt strange to be sitting in the studio...a bit like I had stumbled into someone else's job

It was just a few days after the attacks. The shock and horror of what had happened were still very fresh.

Outside hospitals and other public buildings there were thousands of cards describing people who were lost. Their families and friends were still hoping that they would turn up, perhaps with amnesia, in some hospital bed.

Middle East turmoil

The other big world story in the last two years has been the crisis in the Middle East. Since I left Jerusalem only a few days before I started on Breakfast, it felt strange to be sitting in the studio when I was used to being at the scene. I did, at that time, feel a bit like I had stumbled into someone else's job.

Some of the biggest highlights for me come from the viewers. I have had some wonderful letters and messages from people which have been really touching, or funny or just unusual. I admire anyone who has the energy to send an email or a text message at that time of the day. I am also really pleased and amazed that people want to use up some of their time to contact me.

I will miss a lot about the programme. It is a privilege to be able to share some of the morning with our viewers. I don't expect to miss getting up at 3.30 and going to bed at half past eight. I'll miss the excellent and charming journalists, make-up people, drivers, studio and gallery staff who make Breakfast happen every day.

And of course I'll miss working with Sophie. It was nice for a couple of years to be among Britain's most envied men. We're great friends - and while we won't have Breakfast together quite as often, lunch - or even dinner - involving going out till at least 1030 is quite a prospect.

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