BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Breakfast  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Breakfast Thursday, 1 August, 2002, 05:14 GMT 06:14 UK
Where have all the sparrows gone?
The demise of the sparrow
You can help by monitoring the sparrows in your garden
They used to be a familiar sight in urban areas and city parks, but since the early 1970s, there has been a drastic reduction in the house sparrow population.

The familiar song of the 'cockney sparrow' is becoming rarer and the latest research suggests their numbers may have halved with the London and the south-east the worst affected area.

  • Breakfast's Graham Satchell went to London's Hyde Park to investigate. He spoke to the British Trust for Ornithology's Humphrey Crick.


  • We want to hear from you. Have you noticed fewer sparrows in your area?

    Click here to e-mail us with your views

  • And the British Trust for Ornithology wants your help. There's more information on how you can monitor birds in your own garden on their website.

    The demise of the sparrow
    Home improvements destroy nesting sites

    There used to be around 12 million pairs of birds in Britain, but the British Trust for Ornithology says that the number is now between 6 to 7 million pairs.

    The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs commissioned the research and it is thought that one of the reasons the birds are disappearing is because of the destruction and damage to natural habitats.

    House Sparrow Facts
    Wingspan of 14 to 16cm
    Eat mainly seed and insects
    Found in city centres, parks, gardens, and farms
    Nest in buildings and holes
    Breed in spring and summer

    Sparrows nest in urban areas making their homes in roof voids and holes in buildings, but also in bushes. They are also fast disappearing from farmland.

    The domestic cat, Sparrow hawks and pollution are all blamed for the reduction in numbers; sparrows eat mainly seeds and it's thought that we're not always putting the most suitable food out in gardens.

    The British Trust for Ornithology wants more research into the disappearance of the humble sparrow, and is hoping to raise money in an appeal.

    The public can also get involved by setting up bird monitoring schemes and the BTO has more information about this on their website.

    TELL US WHAT YOU THINK To have your say, e-mail us at breakfasttv@bbc.co.uk

    Send us your comments:
    Name:

    Your E-mail Address:

    Town/City:

    Commenting on:

    Comments:

  • Home
    When we are on air
    Recent forums
    Programme archive
    Studio tour
    Today's information
    MEET THE TEAM
    Presenters
    Reporters
    YOUR SAY
    Contact us
    Your comments
    See also:

    22 Oct 01 | England
    Internet links:


    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


    E-mail this story to a friend

    Links to more Breakfast stories

    © BBC ^^ Back to top

    News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
    South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
    Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
    Programmes