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EDITIONS
Breakfast Monday, 10 June, 2002, 05:30 GMT 06:30 UK
North Pole trekkers enter record books
Pom Oliver, Ann Daniels, and Caroline Hamilton
Frostbite forced Pom Oliver, left, to abandon the trip
Two British women made polar history after completing an 82-day trek across the Arctic Ocean.

The end of their gruelling 750-mile trek from northern Canada, means Ann Daniels and Caroline Hamilton have become the first all-female team to successfully walk to both Poles.


Caroline Hamilton - one half of the historic team - said:

"We started so we had to finish."
Helping each other is what drives us on...we started and wanted to finish. The North trek was harder than South, the temperature was minus 50c for the beginning part, towards the end, it was warmer, to the extent that the Pole was in the middle of a big pool of water, and we were lucky to find a strip that we could safely walk on...


The Two British women who entered the record books when they conquered an expedition between both Poles received heroines' welcomes when they came home.


I am proud of my ladies. They have set us all a wonderful example

Prince of Wales

Mother-of-triplets Ann Daniels and film financier Caroline Hamilton completed the long hike to the North Pole on Sunday June 2nd.

In January 2000 they walked to the South Pole.

Since leaving Ward Hunt Island in northern Canada on March 12, Ms Hamilton and Ms Daniels - from Whimple in Devon - have each pulled a 250lb (113kg) sledge of food and equipment.
Caroline Hamilton (centre) and Ann Daniels (right) with Zoe Hudson
Reaching the South Pole in January 2000

The Prince of Wales was among the first to congratulate the women as he paid a personal tribute to them.

"I am proud of my ladies. I always knew that they would do it after their magnificent efforts in Antarctica," he said.

"They have set us all a wonderful example of determination and true British grit."

Despite being thousands of miles away from home the women took time to commemorate the Queen's Jubilee at the North Pole.

Ms Hamilton, from Spitalfields, central London, told the BBC there were times when it was hard.

"There were moments when it was really, really tough and I thought, 'This is ghastly', but I never wanted to give up," she said.

There were three women in the team when it set off but Pom Oliver, 50 - who was a member of the South Pole expedition - was forced to quit on day 47 with frostbitten feet.

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23 May 02 | England
07 Apr 02 | England
11 Mar 02 | England
01 Mar 02 | England
11 Jan 02 | England
06 May 01 | UK
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