Help
BBC NewsAndrew Marr Show

MORE PROGRAMMES

Page last updated at 11:35 GMT, Sunday, 25 September 2011 12:35 UK

Transcript of Ed Miliband interview

On 25th September 2011 Andrew Marr interviewed Labour leader Ed Miliband

ANDREW MARR:

So now to the reason we're here in Liverpool, which is the Labour Party conference beginning today, and last night the new Leader, Ed Miliband, was promising delegates he would be "taking risks and fighting vested interests." But he knows that everything now happening is happening in the shadow of economic crisis. Mr Miliband, welcome.

ED MILIBAND:

Thank you.

ANDREW MARR:

One of the things that the polling seems to show is that people don't yet understand your basic economic position and your basic economic message. So if you're able to boil it down to a phrase or a paragraph or a sentence, what is it?

ED MILIBAND:

The basic message is this: we've got to cut the deficit, but the best and most important way of doing that is to grow our economy because unless we grow our economy, we won't have people in work, paying taxes, and off benefits, costing the government money. And the problem with the government strategy, Andrew, is that they don't understand that. They don't understand that at home and they don't understand that abroad. And I really say to you that I think we've seen a big change over the last year, which is: A year ago there was a contested argument whether the government strategy should work. It's not working. It's not working for Britain because unemployment is going up, and it's not working even to cut the deficit because unless you grow your economy you can't cut the deficit.

ANDREW MARR:

But how do you possibly get growth at the moment? I mean there isn't money to fund it; the government is going to bring forward infrastructure projects and so on. So where is the growth going to come from?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think the problem is the government isn't bringing forward infrastructure projects. They're just saying we're going to meet the projects we've already promised. Well we've got a simple proposal, which is to cut VAT. Now why do we say temporarily cut VAT? The reason we say that is, as every family knows, when you've got a credit card bill, you've got to make savings; but unless you've got an income coming in, unless you're in work, you're not going to have the money to pay off that bill. And that's why …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) But that's going to cost you 12 billion a year.

ED MILIBAND:

Look of course there are costs of doing something like that, but the truth is that you need to grow your economy; and unless you grow your economy, you're not going to see that happen. And let me just make this point about the international situation because one of the other things that's changed over the last year is this, which is the government strategy was relying on exporting our way out of our current situation. Now you could have made an argument a year ago maybe the world economy will turn out really well, maybe it will be like the 1990s when Canada did something similar. It hasn't turned out that way, and you only need to look at what's happening in the Eurozone and elsewhere. So of course countries like Greece have to sort out their debt issues, but the world's got to sort out its growth issue. And I have to say … Let me just make this point about the international leadership the Prime Minister needs to show. I called a month ago for him to demand a G20 meeting, the group of twenty most important leaders of the world to come together in September to get the world economy moving. Nothing's happened. And I think Matthew Parris said there's an absence of leadership. There is an absence of leadership and I say to the Prime Minister put the politics to one side, start showing some leadership.

ANDREW MARR:

And yet the proposition that the answer for this country is to spend more money now will seem to a lot of people out there a very odd one given the depth of the trouble that places like Greece, Spain, Italy and other countries are in.

ED MILIBAND:

It is about cutting your deficit and let me just be very clear about this. If I was the Prime Minister, we would be having to make cuts. We would meet the plan of halving the deficit over four years. But there's three ways that you meet a plan on the deficit: tax rises, which have already been done by the government; spending cuts; but growth. Growth is the absolute missing ingredient we have. And you know what I feel, Andrew …

ANDREW MARR:

But is that VAT cut really enough to kickstart growth in the economy at the moment?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think it would make a difference. I also say don't leave young people out of work, one in five young people out of work. What I was going to say was that I sense a real feeling of fear in this country - fear that nothing is being done, that the government is if you like just standing aside, as I'm afraid governments have done in history in response to this crisis. Don't stand aside. Put our young people back to work. That's what would make the difference.

ANDREW MARR:

But as a result of their deficit reduction programme, they are not having to pay extra money for their debt. They've still got their triple A rating and …

ED MILIBAND:

(over) But they're not meeting their deficit reduction programme, Andrew. They're not meeting their programme. There's already figures showing there's extra borrowing in our economy. Why is, why is there …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) But you would presumably welcome that?

ED MILIBAND:

… why is there … No, I don't welcome it. I don't welcome extra borrowing because it's extra borrowing caused by a failure to get growth, caused by the fact that people in Britain are out of work, that people in Britain are not getting the jobs and are on benefits and not paying taxes. That's why we're seeing their borrowing numbers going awry.

ANDREW MARR:

That, if I may say so, is a vivid description perhaps of what's going on, but it's not a recipe for how to end it.

ED MILIBAND:

Well I have a very clear plan - cut VAT, put young people back to work with the bank bonus tax, and have international leadership - because we're not isolated, we're not immune from world events.

ANDREW MARR:

Just coming back to the figures. Cutting VAT costs you 12 to 13 billion pounds a year. You're not going to get more out of a bank bonus tax than 2.5 billion max.

ED MILIBAND:

Well I …

ANDREW MARR:

So that is another big bit of government spending at a time when you're saying you want to cut the deficit.

ED MILIBAND:

No, but I say domestic action is necessary now to get growth going. There would have to be cuts if we were in government. To halve the deficit over four years is one of the parts of a plan to cut the deficit. But this international thing is really important, Andrew. I just want to spend a moment on it because, look, in the end we do need the world economy to grow and that's not happening at the moment. And the problem is that the government has if you like tipped the balance in the world towards austerity, and what we need is America growing, we need Germany taking its share, we need Britain growing. We need to change the balance in the world so that there's growth because look at the moment the problem is each country is just looking at its own problems and its own issues, and I'm afraid it's a collective problem and it's got to have a collective solution. And the Prime Minister just going round lecturing the Eurozone on debt, of course the Eurozone's got to solve its debt problems.

ANDREW MARR:

(over) Well to be fair, they've been heavily involved in the talks about dealing with the Greek crisis.

ED MILIBAND:

I think they weren't actually at the meetings at the beginning. But, look, that's not the point.

ANDREW MARR:

Well …

ED MILIBAND:

The point is, the point is …

ANDREW MARR:

… they have been involved.

ED MILIBAND:

… let's have a sensible approach to the debt, yes, but let's get growth going as well. And, look, let me just say this …

ANDREW MARR:

Sorry …

ED MILIBAND:

Let me just make this one other point. I think that Ed Balls has been right about this, right? I think he's been right about this more than anybody. But I don't want to be right. I want the government to do the right thing for the country. And you know there isn't a general election this week or next month, but the country faces a big choice: do we stick to the current course or do we change course? And I was very struck …

ANDREW MARR:

Well just hold on a second. Just coming back to Ed Balls there. I mean last year, as we recall, he said that trying to cut the deficit, halve the deficit over four years was unrealistic, implausible. He used all sorts of rude words about it, and yet now it's his policy and yours.

ED MILIBAND:

No. No what his speech of last August, I think a year ago last August was saying, was that this consensus, this idea that cutting so far and so fast is the answer is not the right answer. And …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) He was talking about Alistair Darling's plans and it was too severe to be credible.

ED MILIBAND:

Look, let me just make this point. I was very struck at Prime Minister's Questions ten days ago because there's the joust at Prime Minister's Questions and sometimes you win and sometimes you lose. The Prime Minister has nothing to say about what's going to be different in the next year from the last year, and over the last year his plan hasn't worked. So what he's got to …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) … he's got to because the conditions have changed ...

ED MILIBAND:

(over) I know.

ANDREW MARR:

I mean the world economy is in crisis.

ED MILIBAND:

So, as I think Keynes said, as the conditions change, you change course. And he should change course. That's what he's got to do.

ANDREW MARR:

And spend more?

ED MILIBAND:

As a first step, we say cut VAT. Keep to a plan to cut the deficit over four years, but do it with growth because that's the only way you're going to achieve what you need to achieve.

ANDREW MARR:

And when you say growth, you're talking about something that is going to take a considerable period of time, so you are actually talking about spending quite a lot more money, extra money now and for the next few years in the hope of growth later?

ED MILIBAND:

No, I'm not saying that. I'm saying that you can't leave an economy flat on its back because it's bad for people in the country and it's bad for your deficit plan. And, look, the government isn't on course to meet its deficit plan. There's already figures showing that. And the problem, the reason is because they don't have the missing ingredient.

ANDREW MARR:

What you're saying is they're not cutting as fast as they said they were going to cut …

ED MILIBAND:

(over) No, no, I'm not, no I'm not saying that.

ANDREW MARR:

… which is quite close to your plan.

ED MILIBAND:

They've done the cut, they've done the cuts, but they haven't got the growth.

ANDREW MARR:

Let's turn to the university fees story.

ED MILIBAND:

Sure.

ANDREW MARR:

This is a reversal of policy because you voted against raising university tuition fees originally and now you're saying that, yes, they have to happen but at a slightly lower rate.

ED MILIBAND:

I don't think it's a reversal of policy. I think it's implementing a policy. Let me explain. The government …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) No, you voted against it to start with.

ED MILIBAND:

Yeah we voted against the £9,000 tuition fee. And what I'm showing today is the way we can change our economy for the future. We face big choices and tough choices in this country, Andrew, and a tough choice that we face is this. Now I think there's an easy answer to it, but do we cut taxes for financial services, do we carry on with a fast buck economy, or do we change course? Do we say invest in the future of our young people? I think we've got to put an end to the fast buck era. I don't think the priority for Britain is to cut taxes for financial services and it's a big choice and it's a big difference between ourselves and the government.

ANDREW MARR:

So this £6,000 cap, is this a clear fixed policy that will go into a future Labour manifesto?

ED MILIBAND:

What it is is a policy that we would do now if we were in an election …

ANDREW MARR:

Which you're not.

ED MILIBAND:

… we've have in our manifesto now, and we're very committed to it. But, look, the election is three and a half years away. If we can do more by the time of the election, we will - if we can do more - but this is an important first step.

ANDREW MARR:

So when you say if you did more, you could lower it further, the cap further …

ED MILIBAND:

Well let's …

ANDREW MARR:

But that … it's not going to go up beyond that £6,000 in a Labour manifesto?

ED MILIBAND:

No what I say is …

ANDREW MARR:

Because I'm just not quite sure what the status of this is.

ED MILIBAND:

The status is that it's something that we would do now, that it's something we're committed to. But the manifesto's three and a half years away. We'll announce the manifesto and I look forward to coming on and talking about it on your programme.

ANDREW MARR:

Yuh, but it's basically you're floating the idea at this stage?

ED MILIBAND:

I think … Look it's pretty clear that I think this is the right thing to do for the country.

ANDREW MARR:

Alright. Let's turn to the Euro itself, which we've talked about a little bit.

ED MILIBAND:

Yuh.

ANDREW MARR:

What is the Labour Party policy on the Euro? Is the party still committed to join the Euro eventually?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I don't foresee us going in now or indeed in the next parliament, in the foreseeable future. I don't think that's going …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) In your political lifetime?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think it's very hard to see that happening. I don't …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) In your political lifetime?

ED MILIBAND:

No, I think that's very unlikely.

ANDREW MARR:

Right, so that's off the agenda. What about Labour's policy on Europe generally because you have got a group of eurosceptic MPs in the Labour Party, and we know there's a big group of eurosceptic MPs in the Conservative Party, and it looks very likely that we're going to have a referendum at some point in this parliament on Europe and there'll be a new treaty change of some kind - that's what people are talking about as a result of the Euro crisis - which would then trigger a referendum under the government's current plans.

ED MILIBAND:

I think they'll do everything they can to avoid a referendum, I suspect.

ANDREW MARR:

But if there were such a referendum, is that the kind of thing that Labour MPs would be allowed to campaign on either side on?

ED MILIBAND:

I think we're a long way away from a referendum on what's going to happen in some future thing. I mean, sure, that's what happened in the 90s …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) What I'm really trying to find out is are you still the same old sort of federal … pro-federalist party that you used to be?

ED MILIBAND:

I don't think we were ever a federalist party.

ANDREW MARR:

Tony Blair would have said he was a …

ED MILIBAND:

No, he would never have said he was a federalist. Look, we're a party that is committed to Britain's place in Europe, but we want a Europe that works for people in this country and I think that's what's the most important thing. And you know I have to say that the big priority for working in Europe at the moment is actually to get the growth. I mean it goes back to our earlier part of that conversation. I think one of the problems of the Prime Minister is that all he wants to do is he sees it as a sort of problem, if you like, and let's stand aside, let's just make sure we don't somehow get lumbered with some of these issues around the Eurozone. Let's get in there, let's get stuck in, let's engage and let's get Europe to grow. That's the priority, not referenda or constitutional changes or any of that stuff.

ANDREW MARR:

Because there seems to be a more sceptical mood about Europe in the country than there was perhaps ten years ago, and part of that is very much connected to immigration and quite a lot of Labour figures have been saying over the past days and weeks that the Labour Party got it wrong over immigration, certainly got it wrong over that large amount of immigration coming from Eastern Europe so quickly. So what have you got to say to that? I mean I know there's this Blue Labour agenda that we're all supposed to …

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think that we did … I said before, I think we did introduce, we did allow the entry of Poland into the free movement of labour too quickly, and that clearly had effects on people right up and down the country and we've clearly got to learn those lessons for the future when it comes to future accession. I think it's very hard to reverse free movement of labour in Europe - British people working abroad benefit from that - but we obviously have to learn lessons from that. I think the other lesson we have to learn is if you have a more open economy in Europe, you've got to put in the right protection for people, for workers. I don't think we did quite enough of that - in ensuring, for example, agency workers got proper protection - so that when, if you like, people came in from abroad, they weren't used to undercut British workers.

ANDREW MARR:

Yuh, which is what's happened. So it's reasonable to say that the last Labour government didn't get it right on immigration?

ED MILIBAND:

I don't think we did get it right, no. I think we got some things wrong. Look, I think one of the things about me and my leadership is I'm the first person to say what we got right and what we got wrong. The biggest thing of all - and I will be saying this in my speech on Tuesday - we've got to change the way our economy works. We didn't do enough to change the ethic of our economy. We've got a short-term fast buck economy. We've got to move to a different sort of economy. When I talk about tuition fees and the change we make on that and the choice between the banks and cutting tuition fees or the energy companies and some of those vested interests, that's part of changing the ethic of our economy so that actually the British people, who are doing the right thing and are currently not getting anything out if you like, see their efforts rewarded.

ANDREW MARR:

So where is growth ultimately going to come from? Where are we going to … how are we going to earn our way in the world because most of our manufacturing has gone as a result of the financial crisis and, I have to say, some of the taxes that have been imposed on it. We're not going to get nearly so much money from the city and financial services anymore, so where are we going to earn money from?

ED MILIBAND:

Well that is something that is very important and I'm going to talk about it on Tuesday, which is we've got to work out how we pay our way in the world. And the way we pay our way in the world is not with the old approach because we were too dependent on the City of London. Now, look, financial services is going to be very important for us in the years to come. It continues to be an important industry, it's really important to recognise that, but we've got to have a government that is committed to helping us in the other industries of the future.

ANDREW MARR:

So how will that happen? Are we going to go back to regional policy, industrial policy?

ED MILIBAND:

I think all of those things are important. Look, let's be …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) As in the old days.

ED MILIBAND:

Well it's not as in the old days because I'm not looking for a British Leyland to prop up and that's not the approach we should take, but I think you do need a government that is committed to working with industry. Just take one example - what government buys, so-called procurement the government makes. Look, I think we've failed - and I'm afraid both parties have failed on this - to use the procurement decisions, as in other parts of Europe, to support British industry. Now the latest failure …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) So be a bit more patriotic about procurement?

ED MILIBAND:

Well yes. And the latest failure of government is on the case of Bombardier where I think they have cruelly sold that company down the river.

ANDREW MARR:

It has to be said that in terms of the last Labour government's failures some of the procurement failures were catastrophic: the NHS computer system, which is now being given up; many of the big defence procurement decisions. For some reason, in power Labour was not able to act in a businesslike manner when it came to the tough decisions.

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think waste always happens in government and it's inexcusable. And there were some things that we did in the last government, which are things that we should be not happy about at all and some of them you mentioned. And so look one of the things, one of the tasks - and I know this is a big task for us - we've got to show the public that we will have absolutely zero tolerance of waste in government; that every penny … As somebody who believes in the power of government, every penny of taxpayers' money should be well spent. Now I have to say about this government, this government is not immune from that either. Their NHS changes, it's a huge waste of billions of pounds, a big reorganisation. We learnt a lesson about reorganisations of the public services when we were in government. I wish they had learnt that lesson.

ANDREW MARR:

What about cheating at the other end of the scale? You've talked a lot about the bankers, but what about … there's growing anger about welfare cheats and yet you won't use the phrase "welfare cheats", will you?

ED MILIBAND:

No, I'm happy to say that people who cheat the welfare system are doing the wrong thing and there are a minority who cheat the welfare system. I gave a speech about this actually in June. I said look, there's issues of responsibility at the top of our society and at the bottom of our society, and that's why I say that we have to change the way our country works and this is the theme that I'm …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) So when a kind of core old-fashioned Labour constituency, a sort of working class constituency turns round and says listen, Labour were not tough enough on crime, they weren't tough enough and strong enough on welfare, they weren't really looking out for the hardworking majority, they've got a point, haven't they?

ED MILIBAND:

Well yes. Let me take each of those just briefly in turn. On the issue of welfare, talking to people in my own constituency, they are most acutely aware of people who are fiddling the system. Now it's important to talk about this in the right way. It's a minority of people, but because I believe in the welfare state and actually I believe in protecting it and renewing it, that's why I say we've got to be intolerant of abuse. I think there's another part of this though. If you're somebody - and people have found this over the last few years - who loses your job, you fall back on a very, very poor safety net, a safety net full of holes. You find yourself on 65 quid a week jobseeker's allowance. So I think there's issues about something for something, if you like, in both senses - those who are abusing the system, but also the hardworking majority who find actually the system isn't supporting them. And one of the problems I have about the government's welfare changes, they're not actually taking action most of all against the people who are abusing the system. They're taking action against people who've paid in all their lives, who've done the right thing, and who are then finding the safety net is being pulled away even further from them.

ANDREW MARR:

And what are the social consequences of the economic outlook? I mean the Prime Minister's spoken about staring down the barrel of a gun pretty much on the future of the economy. Clearly things could get very bad indeed. We saw the riots over the summer. I don't know whether you, in any way, attribute that to economic causes or whether you think it was pure criminality, pure wickedness?

ED MILIBAND:

I don't think you can separate out culture and opportunity. Culture is always an issue and we've talked about responsibility and the importance of responsibility in our society from top to bottom and you need a law and order solution, but issues of opportunity are also important. I have a difference with the Prime Minister though, and this is the difference. He wants to sort of say the problem with Britain is the British people. I think the promise of Britain lies in the British people. The problem is the tragedy of Britain is that's not being fulfilled and I think we can offer people hope and optimism at this conference - things like what we're saying about tuition fees. I think what people want in British politics is to think actually there's an alternative, there's an alternative to pessimism and austerity, and I'm here to say there is an alternative to that.

ANDREW MARR:

And is there anything beyond VAT that you would propose to get the economy moving again because you know this is a vast, vast problem?

ED MILIBAND:

Well, look, I don't want to blow Ed Ball's speech for tomorrow.

ANDREW MARR:

Oh go on, blow Ed Ball's speech! He deserves it, he can take it.

ED MILIBAND:

He'll be talking … Unlike Brown and Blair, we share our speeches with each other. Actually that's a big change that's happened. Look, he'll be talking about this tomorrow. There's a number of things that we can do to help take action. It is absolutely essential. And you know in the end the policy levers are there. The question is will. Does the government have the political will? Are they more interested in protecting the integrity of their own plan or the integrity of the British economy? I say they should care more about the integrity of the British economy.

ANDREW MARR:

One of the internal issues for the Labour Party has been the power of the union vote. You were going to at one point reduce that below 50%. You've gone back on that, have you?

ED MILIBAND:

No, we've actually made an enormous change which Brown …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) So it is going to come below 50%?

ED MILIBAND:

Well let me just tell you, let me tell you. We've just made an enormous change, which Brown, Blair, Neil Kinnock never made, which is registered supporters, people who are not members of the Labour Party, will get a vote in our leadership contest. No other party has opened themselves up to the public in that way.

ANDREW MARR:

So Conservatives could vote for the Labour Leader …

ED MILIBAND:

(over) Well no you have to sign …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) … socialist workers could vote for the Labour Leader?

ED MILIBAND:

(over) … you have to sign up to our aims and objectives and all that. But, look, I think that's really important. We've got to be an outward looking party that listens to the people of Britain and it's a big, big symbolic change which hasn't yet been agreed. I'm hoping to get support for it today at the conference.

ANDREW MARR:

So that is something you want to do, to bring more people into your party?

ED MILIBAND:

Definitely, definitely.

ANDREW MARR:

But what about the size of the union vote because, as I understand it, the change that was first floated is not going to happen?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think that is something that needs to be looked at and we are going to look at it over the coming months. And I saw Len McCluskey on your programme and he said it was something that needed to be looked at. We've got to do it in the right way that gets to a proper solution.

ANDREW MARR:

So why are we not going to get the change at this conference?

ED MILIBAND:

Well I think because it's a complicated set of issues. But, look, I think the big change we're making is around the registered supporters, but I think what the public care about most is not our internal constitutional arrangements but are we a party looking outwards to them. And what I say to my party members and others is I don't want to diminish your power, but I want us to open up as a party.

ANDREW MARR:

It's not simply that the people who helped you become Labour Leader are pulling the strings, is it?

ED MILIBAND:

I think after what I said on the strikes on June 30th, Andrew, I don't think anybody can accuse me of sort of not being my own man. I am my own man and I say what I think.

ANDREW MARR:

So being your own man, what do you think about the strikes mooted for November?

ED MILIBAND:

I think they've got to be avoided, and I think the way they've got to be avoided is by government getting around the table and seriously negotiating. I just want to say this. John Hutton's report - Lord Hutton, the former Labour Minister - it was a tough report, but it was a good report about the future of public sector pensions. The government is ignoring the Hutton Report. It is imposing a 3% tax rise on public sector workers without negotiation. Now imagine if I came along or they came along and said we're going to pick out one group in society, say the shopkeepers, and we're going to impose a 3% tax rise on them. People would say well that's completely unfair, that's completely unjustified. So what I say to the government is let's not go back to the 80s, let's not go back to a government spoiling for a fight. Let's have a government seriously negotiating. There's two months till this strike may happen. Their job is to avoid it happening.

ANDREW MARR:

And for those union members watching and listening at the moment who are thinking well if the government don't get round the table, if the proposition remains as it is, Ed Miliband will be there on the streets with us in protest?

ED MILIBAND:

I'm not interested in the ifs. I'm interested in avoiding the strikes. Strikes are a sign of failure. We've got to avoid them and there's a big responsibility on government to stop them happening.

ANDREW MARR:

Okay. It's been a big year for you - got married, had your first year as Leader. What do you say to those people who say you're not cutting through? Tessa Jowell is saying "it's all white noise; no-one's listening to us" this morning in the paper.

ED MILIBAND:

I think when you lose an election - and we had our second worst result since we were founded in 2010 - it takes time for people to tune back into you. And, look, in the end I actually think people should recognise what they were saying about Labour before the election. People said we'd be tearing ourselves apart, we'd be a party in decline. We've had 65,000 more members, 800 new councillors, won every by-election that we've fought. Actually we're a party on the way back. There's a long way to go and I, more than anyone, know the scale of the task. But you know what's most important? I know who I am and I know where I want to take this country, and that's what I'm going to be talking about this week.

ANDREW MARR:

We had a very moving interview with Philip Gould last week, you may have seen it, in which he said he would love the two brothers, the two real brothers to be reconciled at the end. Is that going to happen? Are you going to be able to get David back?

ED MILIBAND:

(over) Well I mean first let me say about Philip that he's been a fantastic advocate for our party and he's a fantastic friend and I'm obviously in touch with him and I saw the moving interview that he did with you. Look on David, he's providing huge support to me. He's providing huge support to me as a brother and it's support I'm incredibly grateful for. And he's doing his own thing, he's getting on with helping us. There's something called Movement for Change, which he has founded, to help organise people in Labour parties up and down the country, so they can go out and make a difference in their own area. And you know …

ANDREW MARR:

Would you like to see him back at the top of the tree though? I mean …

ED MILIBAND:

Of course I would and I've always … Of course I would and I've always said that. But, look, that's - in the end - his decision and I'm getting on with my job …

ANDREW MARR:

(over) And that could happen, you think?

ED MILIBAND:

Of course it could happen. But I'm getting on with my job. He's focused on supporting me and doing his own things. And you know, as I say, we've moved on and I think everybody else should too.

ANDREW MARR:

The most important thing that happened to you this year?

ED MILIBAND:

Well, getting married…

ANDREW MARR:

Alright.

ED MILIBAND:

…Was fantastic and it's great to have Justine and the kids here supporting me.

ANDREW MARR:

Ed Miliband, thank you very much indeed for joining us this morning.

ED MILIBAND:

Thank you.

INTERVIEW ENDS




FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit