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Last Updated: Thursday, 3 March 2005, 09:58 GMT
China's New Faces: Jimmy Ye
China's economic reforms have transformed the country's cities and the lifestyles of many residents.

It has the world's fastest growing economy, with millions moving to the country's rapidly expanding cities.

As part of the BBC's China Week, BBC World Service spoke to some of the new generation of Chinese experiencing rapid change.



Chen Luyu
Chen Luyu:
Talk show host

Ai Weiwei
Ai Weiwei:
Artist

Jimmy ye
Jimmy Ye:
Successful businessman

Zhang Xin
Zhang Xin:
Property developer

Jimmy Ye

Jimmy Ye
Jimmy Ye has been involved in a number of successful ventures
Multimillionaire Jimmy Ye is positioning himself as China's leisure king - he started out in software, but sold his business some years ago for US $30 million.

Now he runs a home furnishings store, as well as an auto leisure park, consisting of an off-road track, China's first Formula Three race track, a drive-in cinema and top car dealerships.

I believe there's an automobile boom in China, which is already happening.

The automobile is just like the furniture and IT boom, which happened ten years ago.

In Beijing now there are 1.3 million private cars, and thousands and thousands hitting the road.

With four million driving licences already issued, you can see that millions of private cars are going to be issued here in Beijing.

Only the lower and middle income car owners come to this off-road track. The wealthy ones and upper income automobile owners go to the formula three track.

Usually they own a Ferrari or a Porsche, or even a one-seater open wheel car which cost around four-hundred thousand dollars, which they buy from the United Kingdom.

There are still millions of people going hungry in the remote parts of China. But I encourage the middle class, the wealthy to spend money on automobiles instead of golf or gambling.

Golf takes up a lot of land. While if they spend money on cars, they can drive them all over China and see the real China and then they'll feel sorry and spend money on poor people.





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