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Last Updated: Monday, 19 March 2007, 12:04 GMT
About the BBC's Iraq week
Children gather around a US soldier in Sadr City
A BBC/ABC poll says 18% of Iraqis have confidence in the coalition
BBC News is marking the fourth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq with a week of special programming, from Monday 19 March.

The week begins with a wide-ranging poll of Iraqi opinion, which includes analysis and graphics focusing on issues such as security, attitudes to the government and the presence of coalition troops.

Throughout the week, BBC correspondents will report from different locations around the country.

  • Baghdad correspondent Andrew North - who writes a regular diary for the BBC News website - will be sending updates from Ramadi, where he is embedded with US troops.

  • Ten O'Clock News presenter Huw Edwards will provide a diary of his trip to Basra and answer questions from readers on the situation there.

  • Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen will assess the effect of the Iraq conflict on the region and consider its implications for the future.

  • Middle East correspondent Paul Wood is embedded with UK soldiers in the south. He will look at the changing shape of the mission and asses how successful the handover of security to the Iraqis has been.

  • The BBC News website has created an animated map of Baghdad, showing key locations, ethnic divisions, major bomb attacks carried out by the insurgency, and sectarian violence.

  • A series of diaries - My Iraq - will hear from ordinary Iraqis, among them a TV chef, a police diver, a businessman and a musician.

    People affected by and involved in the Iraqi situation living in the US and the UK will also contribute, including Ali Abbas, the boy who lost both arms and his family in the Iraq war.

  • There will also be a report on the state of the country's education system. Reporter Hugh Sykes will be talking to parents and children about how pupils cope with getting to school and what it is like when they're there.





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