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Last Updated: Monday, 27 November 2006, 11:38 GMT
Press doubts over Gaza ceasefire
Israeli-Palestinian Press

Most Israeli papers are sceptical that the ceasefire in the Gaza Strip will last long, with one calling it "shaky" and another complaining that "Israel has lost once again".

Only one daily welcomes the development, praising the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas for his part in securing the agreement.

The tone in the Palestinian press is more positive. One commentator believes the ball is now in the Israeli court, although another argues that both sides can easily break the ceasefire.

HAGAY HUBERMAN IN ISRAEL'S HATZOFE

There are few within the security establishment who believe that this ceasefire will hold. Israel's military history teaches that each time there was a ceasefire without Israel resolving that issue once and for all, it allowed the Arab side to organise for the next round.

NAHUM BARNEA IN ISRAEL'S YEDIOT AHARONOT

The ceasefire is shaky, based on a temporary convergence of interests between mortal enemies. It is very possible that voices on the Israeli right - who prophesy that what we have here is nothing but a truce at best to be followed by a much graver conflagration - are right.

AMIR RAPAPORT IN ISRAEL'S MAARIV

No matter how shiny the wrapping is on the agreement, Israel has lost once again. The sight of Sderot residents fleeing while the IDF stands helpless is a real Israeli disgrace.

ISRAEL'S JERUSALEM POST

There is no point in a ceasefire if the border between Egypt and Gaza remains a conduit for a constant flow of weaponry to Hamas and other terrorist groups. Plainly, in such a circumstance, any time-out is only a precursor to a renewal of intensified violence down the road.

ISRAEL'S HAARETZ

The ceasefire is a welcome step toward putting an end to the spiralling bloodshed of recent weeks in the south. The agreement among Palestinian factions to a ceasefire is an important achievement for Abbas who, in spite his weakness, has retained his stature as the one who represents the Palestinians in the territories and talks with Israel on their behalf.

PALESTINIAN AL-QUDS

It is possible to say - without exempting the factions from any responsibility - that the ball is now in the Israeli court. The Palestinians are not the only ones who are responsible for the continuity of the ceasefire and truce. This agreement needs two partners to succeed.

MAHMUD AL-HABBASH IN PALESTINIAN AL-HAYAT AL-JADIDAH

There is great doubt regarding the results [of the ceasefire agreement], especially in light of the fragile security situation the Palestinians are experiencing. Any militant faction or even individual can breach this agreement despite the deployment of all these Palestinian security forces on the Gaza border. We should also not forget the rich record Israel has in breaching ceasefires.

TALAL AWKAL IN PALESTINIAN AL-AYYAM

Israel prefers that the ceasefire comes via international efforts, especially after having to shelve its convergence plan. Israel reached this ceasefire so as not to find itself forced to deal with political initiatives that might be forced on it.

ASHRAF AL-AJRAMI IN PALESTINIAN AL-AYYAM

We need to unite our resistance effort, policies and diplomacy to achieve our national objectives, especially the establishment of an independent Palestinian state within the 1967 borders. Here, President Mahmoud Abbas bears a special responsibility because he is the one controlling the National Security Branch and Presidential Guard.

YUSOF AL-QAZAZ IN PALESTINIAN AL-HAYAT AL-JADIDAH

The new European peace initiative spearheaded by Spain is a rare chance for Israel to find a way out of repeated wars with the Arabs. This initiative enjoys [wide Arab] support because of the need to achieve stability in this region that is historically and geographically close to Europe. The Israelis also need peace, which means that they will have to recognise the Palestinian people's right to establish an independent state.

BBC Monitoring selects and translates news from radio, television, press, news agencies and the internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages. It is based in Caversham, UK, and has several bureaux abroad.





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The Palestinian press
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