[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Monday, 6 November 2006, 12:02 GMT
Mideast press brands Saddam trial "farce"
Mideast press

Newspapers across the Middle East believe the death sentence passed on Saddam Hussein will do little to heal Iraq's wounds.

While few shed any tears for the former Iraqi leader, most dismiss the trial process as a farce, and Iranian papers voice regret that not more was done to reveal the West's former ties to Saddam

In Iraq itself, the curfew still in force after the verdict meant newspapers were unable to publish on Monday.

ABD-AL-BARI ATWAN IN PAN-ARAB AL-QUDS AL-ARABI

The death penalty passed on Saddam did not surprise anyone, as it was expected from the first day the farcical trial began. The trial and the verdict are a new fiction series being sold to the people of Iraq, to complete those of the parliamentary elections and fooling Iraqis into believing that authority has been transferred to them.

PAN-ARAB AL-ARAB AL-ALAMIYA

Iraqis still view Saddam as a hero and Arabs see him as a national hero. The verdict will increase his popularity and, in contrast, will increase hatred for Americans in the region. This will threaten US aims and interests in the region.

GHASSAN SHARBIL IN PAN-ARAB AL-HAYAT

We are witnessing the crumbling of Iraq. Post-Saddam Hussein, Iraq has been more dangerous to itself and its neighbours. There is no cause for celebration as we fear that thousands of young Saddams will be born in every locality in Iraq and will make killing their trade.

LEBANON'S THE DAILY STAR

When and if Saddam is eventually hanged, Iraqis will finally be rid of a tyrannical dictator who shamelessly brutalised his own people. But it may be a long time before they escape the stranglehold of tyranny and brutality, which are just as pervasive - if not more so - in the era wrought by what the United States called "Operation Iraqi Freedom".

BASIM SAKGHA IN JORDAN'S AL-DUSTUR

Everything that happened in the trial of Saddam Hussein leads us to liken it to a farce. From the very beginning, the defence was prevented from defending, a judge was removed for being neutral and the public prosecution was provocative about every detail. What happened yesterday underlines that Saddam Hussein is still an important party in Iraq.

SAMI AL-MAAITA IN JORDAN'S AL-GHAD

We will concede that the court has fair and even-handed judiciary, but will the third case, after Dujail and Anfal, be on the massacres that took the lives of dozens and hundreds of Iraqis in Falluja or in other Iraqi cities and villages? Will an indictment be issued against those responsible for the daily series of sectarian killing?

EGYPT'S AL-JUMHURIYA

Whether Saddam lives or is hanged, this will most certainly not affect the strength of the Iraqi national resistance against the occupation, because this resistance emanates from the free Iraqi people and translates its hopes in liberation from the occupiers, the recovery of its sovereignty and dignity in order to live proud like all other peoples.

ANWAR AL-HAWWARI IN EGYPT'S AL-WAFD

However ugly the occupation, and however bad the situation is in Iraq, none of this can invalidate an important truth: Saddam Hussein was a dictator who killed his people, then his sons, and then himself. Whatever the reasons for sympathy with Saddam Hussein in large parts of Arab public opinion, this should not prevent us from revealing the bitter truth: Arabs currently do not value the importance of freedom enough, and this is the real catastrophe.

SAUDI AL-RIYADH

Let Saddam go, let Iraq stay.

IRAN'S AFARINESH

It seems that the scenario of Saddam's court has been able to remove him from the scene. Saddam is going to be hanged while his other international crimes are not dealt with in court. This means there will be no Saddam and no court to put Saddam and his former friends and today's enemies on trial and reveal the reality of what happened.

IRAN'S HAMSHAHRI

Saddam proves that it is impossible to live like a hero by oppressing the people. He has been sentenced to hang, but there is still one unanswered question: Why did the human rights defenders who occupy the rich country of Iraq today support Saddam for so many years?

IRAN'S RESALAT

Saddam is playing out the last scene of the White House scenario after 40 years of being at their service. Now he is the Republicans' trump card... in the run-up to the US mid-term elections.

JACKY HUGI IN ISRAEL'S MA'ARIV

This was the most ridiculous political trial in history and therefore also the saddest. It dealt with an act of murder and genocide with the most abysmal incompetence.

ZVI BAREL IN ISRAEL'S HA'ARETZ

A court-ordered execution lacks the cathartic power it might otherwise have had. It can neither close a chapter nor open a new era. It is just another death sentence - one of the dozens that Iraqi militias carry out each day against civilians from rival communities. For this reason, the verdict will also have no real impact on what is happening on the streets of Baghdad and Mosul.







MIDDLE EAST PRESS PROFILES
 

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific