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Last Updated: Friday, 3 March 2006, 17:14 GMT
Iraq captures Saudi blast suspect
Abdullah al-Harbi
Abdullah al-Harbi was said he had been heading to Mosul
Iraq says its forces have captured a Saudi who has admitted to involvement in an attempted suicide attack on an oil facility in Saudi Arabia.

Abdullah Salih al-Harbi was arrested on the desert border between Iraq and Saudi Arabia on Tuesday, police said.

Iraqi police said Mr Harbi told them he had fled to Iraq with five others responsible for the attack.

The attack on the Abqaiq oil-processing plant on 24 February was the first known targeting of an oil installation.

It was stopped when guards fired on cars packed with explosives trying to ram the gates.

The Saudi authorities said two perpetrators were killed during the incident on 24 February.

A further three were reportedly shot dead in a raid on a villa in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, on Monday.

Search

Mr Harbi, 32, was detained in the desert near the town of Samawa, some 300km south of Baghdad, a spokesman for the Iraqi border guards said.

Saadoun al-Jabiri said the Saudi had been heading to the northern Iraqi city of Mosul to meet people linked to al-Qaeda and to get weapons.

Iraqi police said Mr Harbi gave the names of eight others who had been involved in the Abqaiq attack, saying five had travelled to Iraq with him and three were still in Saudi Arabia.

The border guards are continuing to search for the men in the desert at the border between Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

There has been no comment from Saudi Arabia.


SEE ALSO:
Saudi most wanted killed in raid
28 Feb 06 |  Middle East
Saudis claim upper hand with al-Qaeda
27 Feb 06 |  Middle East
'Oil attackers' killed in Saudi
27 Feb 06 |  Middle East
Al-Qaeda 'behind Saudi oil plot'
25 Feb 06 |  Middle East
Saudis 'foil oil facility attack'
24 Feb 06 |  Middle East
Q&A: Saudi oil attack
24 Feb 06 |  Middle East



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