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Last Updated: Wednesday, 14 April, 2004, 20:05 GMT 21:05 UK
Text: Bush on Gaza withdrawal
US President George W Bush has endorsed controversial Israeli plans to pull out of the Gaza Strip and parts of the West Bank. The text of his statement in Washington follows:

I remain hopeful and determined to find a way forward toward a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian dispute.

I welcome the disengagement plan prepared by the government of Israel, under which Israel would withdraw certain military installations and all settlements from Gaza, and withdraw certain military installations and settlements in the West Bank.

These steps will mark real progress toward realising the vision I set forth in June 2002 of two states living side by side in peace and security, and make a real contribution toward peace.
The United States supports the establishment of a Palestinian state that is viable, contiguous, sovereign and independent

I am hopeful that steps pursuant to this plan, consistent with this vision, will remind all states and parties of their own obligations under the roadmap.

I believe certain principles, which are very widely accepted in the international community, show us the path forward:

  • The right of self-defence and the need to fight terrorism are equally matters of international agreement

  • The two-state vision and the roadmap for peace designed to implement it command nearly universal support as the best means of achieving a permanent peace and an end to the Israeli occupation that began in 1967

  • United Nations Security Council resolutions have repeatedly spoken of the desirability of establishing two independent states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side within secure and recognised borders

Two states

Having these principles in mind, the United States is able to make the following comments.

The United States remains committed to the vision of two states living side by side in peace and security, and its implementation as described in the roadmap.

The United States will do its utmost to prevent any attempt by anyone to impose any other plan. There will be no security for Israelis or Palestinians until they and all states, in the region and beyond, join together to fight terrorism and dismantle terrorist organisations.

The United States reiterates its steadfast commitment to Israel's security, including secure, defensible borders, and to preserve and strengthen Israel's capability to deter and defend itself, by itself, against any threat or possible combination of threats.

The United States will join with others in the international community to strengthen the capacity and will of Palestinian security forces to fight terrorism and dismantle terrorist capabilities and infrastructure.

Israel will retain its right to defend itself against terrorism, including to take actions against terrorist organisations.

The United States will lead efforts, working together with Jordan, Egypt and others in the international community to build the capacity and will of Palestinian institutions to fight terrorism, dismantle terrorist organisations and prevent the areas from which Israel has withdrawn from posing a threat that would have to be addressed by any other means.

The United States understands that after Israel withdraws from Gaza and/or parts of the West Bank, and pending agreements on other arrangements, existing arrangements regarding control of airspace, territorial waters and land passages of the West Bank and Gaza will continue.

The United States remains committed to the two-state solution for peace in the Middle East as set forth in June 2002, and to the road map as the best path to realise that vision.

The goal of two independent states has repeatedly been recognised in international resolutions and agreements, and it remains a key to resolving this conflict.

Israel's security

The United States is strongly committed to Israel's security and well-being as a Jewish state.

It seems clear that an agreed, just, fair and realistic framework for a solution to the Palestinian refugee issue as part of any final status agreement will need to be found through the establishment of a Palestinian state and the settling of Palestinian refugees there, rather than in Israel.

As part of a final peace settlement, Israel must have secure and recognised borders, which should emerge from negotiations between the parties in accordance with UNSC Resolutions 242 and 338.

In light of new realities on the ground, including already existing major Israeli populations centres, it is unrealistic to expect that the outcome of final status negotiations will be a full and complete return to the armistice lines of 1949, and all previous efforts to negotiate a two-state solution have reached the same conclusion.

It is realistic to expect that any final status agreement will only be achieved on the basis of mutually agreed changes that reflect these realities.

Palestinian statehood

The United States supports the establishment of a Palestinian state that is viable, contiguous, sovereign and independent, so that the Palestinian people can build their own future in accordance with the vision I set forth in June 2002 and with the path set forth in the road map.

The United States will join with others in the international community to foster the development of democratic political institutions and new leadership committed to those institutions, the reconstruction of civic institutions, the growth of a free and prosperous economy and the building of capable security institutions dedicated to maintaining law and order and dismantling terrorist organisations.

Under the roadmap, Palestinians must undertake an immediate cessation of armed activity and all acts of violence against Israelis anywhere, and all official Palestinian institutions must end incitement against Israel.

The Palestinian leadership must act decisively against terror, including sustained, targeted and effective operations to stop terrorism and dismantle terrorist capabilities and infrastructure.

Palestinians must undertake a comprehensive and fundamental political reform that includes a strong parliamentary democracy and an empowered prime minister.

The government of Israel is committed to take additional steps on the West Bank, including progress toward a freeze on settlement activity, removing unauthorised outposts and improving the humanitarian situation by easing restrictions on the movement of Palestinians not engaged in terrorist activities.

As the government of Israel has stated, the barrier being erected by Israel should be a security rather than political barrier, should be temporary rather than permanent and therefore not prejudice any final status issues including final borders, and its route should take into account, consistent with security needs, its impact on Palestinians not engaged in terrorist activities.

A peace settlement negotiated between Israelis and Palestinians would be a great boon not only to those peoples but to the peoples of the entire region.

Accordingly, all states in the region have special responsibilities: to support the building of the institutions of a Palestinian state; to fight terrorism, and cut off all forms of assistance to individuals and groups engaged in terrorism; and to begin now to move toward more normal relations with the State of Israel.

These actions would be true contributions to building peace in the region.


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