[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
LANGUAGES
arabic
persian
pashto
turkish
french
Last Updated: Monday, 18 August, 2003, 21:35 GMT 22:35 UK
Baghdad blast kills US soldier

US soldiers at scene of an attack
There are at least 10 attacks a day on US troops in Iraq

An American soldier has been killed by an explosive device in Baghdad.

US Central Command said a soldier from the 1st Armoured Division died after the incident in the Karradah district of the Iraqi capital at 1400 (1000 GMT) on Monday.

The soldier was medically evacuated to a combat support hospital, where he was pronounced dead about an hour later. No further details about the explosion were given.

Before the latest incident the US Army said 60 of its troops had been killed in Iraq since President George W Bush announced the end of major combat on 1 May.

At least three died last week in separate ambushes. On Sunday a Danish soldier serving with the international stabilisation force in Iraq died in a clash near the southern city of Basra.

Regular attacks

On Monday, the Pentagon confirmed that US troops had shot and killed Reuters cameraman Mazen Dana when they mistook his camera for a rocket-propelled grenade launcher.

Real attacks by gunmen or militants armed with rocket grenades are almost a daily challenge for US troops in Iraq.

Coalition sources say there are more than 10 attacks each day on US soldiers, which have been blamed on fighters loyal to Saddam Hussein and foreign militants, the BBC's Susannah Price reports from Baghdad.

Meanwhile the US forces continue to carry out raids and arrests in an attempt to round up the militant loyalists and former regime leaders.




RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific