BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Persian Pashto Turkish French
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: Middle East  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
 Monday, 30 December, 2002, 20:01 GMT
UN tightens screws on Iraq
UN inspectors at water purification plant
Inspectors visited at least six sites on Monday
The United Nations Security Council has approved a resolution expanding the list of civilian goods that Iraq cannot import without prior approval.

A team of 25 inspectors stormed into the plant in a manner similar to the work of gangs

Iraqi official
The United States has been calling for the resolution, which enlarges an already existing list of goods that can have military use.

The list is part of a deal that allows Iraq to sell oil in return for food and humanitarian supplies.

The vote came as an Iraqi official criticised UN weapons inspectors for behaving like gangsters during one of their inspections on Monday.

"A team of 25 inspectors stormed into the plant... in a way never seen before and in a manner similar to the work of gangs," said Mohammad Hussein, head of a missile facility at Abu Ghreib, 25 kilometres west of Baghdad.

Inspectors counted missile engines at the site, one of at least six visited on Monday.

There are now 110 inspectors in Iraq trying to establish whether Iraq still has weapons of mass destruction.

US insistence

Monday's Security Council resolution was passed 13-0, with Russia and Syria abstaining.

MONDAY'S INSPECTIONS
Missile facility, Abu Ghreib
Facility producing moulds and tools in Baghdad suburb of Zafaraniyah
Health laboratory, central Baghdad
Resin and fibreglass plants near al Taji, north of Baghdad
Al Mahmoudiayah water treatment facility south of Baghdad
Agriculture Ministry site, Abu Ghreib
It adds more than 50 items to the Goods Review List, which was originally adopted in May, including chemicals, pharmaceutical drugs, electronics, mechanical equipment, boats and vehicles.

The list was negotiated earlier this year, but Washington has insisted on expanding it.

The BBC's Greg Barrow at the UN says there has been widespread speculation that the US was using the list as a way of limiting Iraq's military capability ahead of a possible military intervention.

However, American diplomats maintain that they regard the list merely as a way of streamlining sanctions and speeding up the delivery of humanitarian goods to Iraq.

Moscow objected to the inclusion in the list of Russian-made heavy trucks, which it says are purely for civilian use.

France initially opposed the inclusion of certain antibiotics which could be used to protect Iraqi soldiers using chemical weapons, but accepted a compromise limiting the ban to high doses of the drugs.

Syria, which is Baghdad's closest ally on the Security Council, was not expected to support the resolution.

  WATCH/LISTEN
  ON THIS STORY
  The BBC's Matt Prodger
"Voting to expand the list of goods Iraq is forbidden to have"

Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

30 Dec 02 | Middle East
28 Dec 02 | Middle East
31 Dec 02 | Europe
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Middle East stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Middle East stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes