BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Persian Pashto Turkish French
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Middle East  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 26 November, 2002, 06:23 GMT
UN compromises on Iraqi aid plan
Men beneath a portrait of Saddam Hussein in Baghdad
Iraq is allowed to sell oil to buy some supplies
The BBC's Greg Barrow

The United Nations Security Council has voted to extend its humanitarian programme in Iraq for just nine days.

The short extension was agreed to allow time to resolve differences over the possible review of a list of items contained within the resolution that Iraq is prohibited from importing under the oil-for-food programme.

The United States wants a tight timetable to add more items to the list, which it says Iraq is trying to import for possible military use.

The oil-for-food programme is meant to be Iraq's humanitarian lifeline to the outside world.

The UN monitors the sale of Iraqi oil and keeps the proceeds in a special bank account.

US Ambassador to UN John Negroponte
The US wants to add to the list of items Iraq may not purchase
Baghdad can then make requests for civilian goods, such as food and medicine, to be purchased from the account.

Few here would argue that the system is perfect.

But it has worked reasonably well for many years, and the UN Security Council was widely expected to adopt a resolution extending the programme for another six months.

But problems arose when the US said it wanted to add more items to a list of goods that Iraq is forbidden from importing under the programme.

American officials argue that Iraq is still attempting to import goods that could have some military use.

Hasty review rejected

Specifically, US officials have mentioned electronic devices used to jam global positioning systems, and equipment that can intercept radio communication.

They are particularly concerned about what they say is an attempt by Baghdad to procure huge quantities of atropine, a drug that can be used on the battlefield to combat the effects of a nerve gas attack.

Other nations on the Security Council did not want to be pressured into making a hasty overhaul of the list of goods forbidden to Iraq under the oil-for-food programme.

Compromise finally came in an agreement to extend the programme for just nine days while efforts to resolve this dispute continue.


Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

13 Nov 02 | Middle East
06 Sep 02 | Business
16 May 02 | Middle East
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Middle East stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Middle East stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes