BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Persian Pashto Turkish French
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Middle East  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 29 October, 2002, 10:13 GMT
Iraq says Bush abusing UN
UN car in Baghdad
UN inspectors left Baghdad nearly four years ago
Iraq's foreign minister has said a new UN resolution is not needed to resolve the crisis over arms inspections, accusing the US of using the organisation as a rubber stamp to authorise American "colonialism".

Naji Sabri told the BBC that the new inspections regime his government had agreed to was already unprecedented in its intrusiveness and complexity.


This draft resolution is an attempt to use the United Nations as a rubber stamp to authorise a new era of American colonialism

Naji Sabri, Iraqi Foreign Minister
The United Nations Security Council is locked in intensive negotiations over the wording of a tough draft resolution submitted by the US with support from Britain, which calls for a strengthened inspections regime.

US President George W Bush has again warned that if the UN does not have what he called the will or the courage to confront Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, the United States would disarm him.

In its current form, the draft finds Iraq in "material breach" of Security Council resolutions, and warns of "serious consequences" if it fails to comply - which is interpreted as diplomatic code for military action.

Alternative proposals

Russia and France - both permanent members of the council with the power to veto the US proposals - fear the draft resolution will act as a trigger for a military strike on Iraq.

They have both circulated alternative proposals to the draft.

Mr Sabri blamed Britain and America for delaying the resumption of weapons inspections.

"This draft resolution is an attempt to use the United Nations as a rubber stamp to authorise a new era of American colonialism," he said.

Naji Sabri
Naji Sabri says the US and Britain do not want inspectors to return
"When inspectors come here they will disclose to the whole world the lies and fabrications of the US administration and (UK Prime Minister) Tony Blair."

Mr Sabri added that opposition to the draft resolution was very strong within the Security Council, which he said would never approve it.

The BBC's Rageh Omaar, in Baghdad, says that Iraq has tried everything to hamper the drive for a new UN resolution and has done so by effectively agreeing to resume weapons inspections at the earliest date.

But as diplomatic pressure from the US grows, its efforts to forestall a new resolution are now fading fast.

Call for unity

The draft needs nine "yes" votes and no veto to succeed.

The fifth permanent member of the council - China - is expected to abstain. The 10 elected members are believed to be divided on the issue.

The US says it wants a decision this week.

On Monday, the council was briefed by UN's chief weapons inspector, Hans Blix.

After the behind-closed-doors meeting, Mr Blix said he had stressed the necessity of "broad unity" within the council.

"It helps if Iraq is conscious that non-co-operation will entail reactions by the council," he said.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Iraqi Foreign Minister Naji Sabri
"It is an attempt to use the UN as a rubberstamp to authorise a new era of American colonialism"

Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

28 Oct 02 | Americas
27 Oct 02 | Americas
27 Oct 02 | Media reports
23 Oct 02 | Middle East
03 Oct 02 | Americas
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Middle East stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Middle East stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes