BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Persian Pashto Turkish French
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Middle East  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 28 August, 2002, 12:16 GMT 13:16 UK
Iraq urges dialogue to avert war
US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
Rumsfeld said the US would act in its best interests
Iraq has said it believes there is still a chance of a diplomatic solution to its stand-off with the United States, but that it was ready to defend itself in the event of a war.

"We believe that dialogue has not totally been cut off, but is being blocked by American pressure," Iraqi Vice-President Taha Yassin Ramadan told Reuters news agency on Wednesday.


Aggressors... must be crushed

Taha Yassin Ramadan, Iraqi vice-president
Mr Ramadan's comments came amid increasing signs that Washington is preparing to take military action against Iraq to topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.

On Tuesday, US Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said America would not wait for unanimous support from other countries in deciding on whether to go to war with Iraq.

Earlier, US President George W Bush reiterated his view that the Iraqi leader must go, telling the Saudi ambassador to the US that Saddam Hussein was a threat to world peace.

The Saudi foreign minister, meanwhile, has told the BBC that removing Saddam Hussein from power would not provide stability in the Middle East.

'No joke'

The Iraqi vice-president told Reuters that Iraq took America's warnings seriously.

Taha Yassin Ramadan
Ramadan said Iraq was prepared to defend itself

"We do not consider the American threats a joke, nor do we regard them fatalistically," said Mr Ramadan.

"We believe in the right of any people to defend themselves, and in the end we have faith that aggressors... must be crushed."

Mr Ramadan said Iraq believed "dialogue is the correct way to solve any problem".

On Tuesday, Saddam Hussein called for a solution to the deadlock "based on international legitimacy, international law and the UN charter," the official Iraqi News Agency reported.

America has accused Iraq of developing weapons of mass destruction and demanded Baghdad readmit UN weapons inspectors barred from the country since 1998.

Bush 'like Churchill'

Speaking to thousands of US marines at Camp Pendleton in California, Mr Rumsfeld said President Bush would ultimately decide on a course of action based on what he felt was in America's best interests.


It is less important to have unanimity than it is to be making the right decisions and doing the right thing

Donald Rumsfeld, US defence secretary

Mr Rumsfeld compared Mr Bush's warnings about Saddam Hussein to UK Prime Minister Winston Churchill's stand against Adolf Hitler.

"It wasn't until each country [in Europe] got attacked that they said: 'Maybe Winston Churchill was right. Maybe that lone voice expressing concern about what was happening was right'," he said.

Despite international misgivings about a possible US attack on Iraq, the defence secretary said he was confident America would find support.

"When our country does make the right judgments, the right decisions, then other countries do co-operate," he said.

But, he added, "it is less important to have unanimity than it is to be making the right decisions and doing the right thing".

Iraqi diplomacy

As the US continued to insist that Saddam Hussein had to be dealt with, Iraq launched a diplomatic drive to garner support against a US strike.

President Bush with Saudi ambassador Prince Bandar bin Sultan
Bush has been seeking Arab support

While the Iraqi vice-president held talks in Syria, the Iraqi Foreign Minister Naji Sabri won strong backing on a visit to China, a permanent member of the UN Security Council.

Chinese Foreign Minister Tank Jiaxuan said "threatening to resort to force will not solve the problem", state-run Chinese television reported.

Earlier, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak warned that the Arab world was opposed to war with Iraq, which he said could destabilise the Middle East.

His view was echoed by Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal, who told the BBC that dealing with the Iraqi leader by trying to remove him from the outside would never work.

Prince al-Faisal said Iraq might still readmit weapons inspectors and that focusing on replacing Saddam Hussein was a mistake.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's David Chazan
"If the Iraqi people in the final analysis don't want Saddam Hussein, it is they who will change him"
Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal
"Whether Saddam Hussein remains or is removed from power is up to the Iraqi people"
Charles Delfer, former Deputy Chairman of UNSCOM
"This is coercive disarmament"

Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

28 Aug 02 | Middle East
27 Aug 02 | Middle East
27 Aug 02 | Americas
27 Aug 02 | Business
07 Aug 02 | Middle East
27 Aug 02 | Middle East
26 Aug 02 | Middle East
16 Aug 02 | Middle East
15 Jan 01 | Middle East
24 Aug 02 | Middle East
22 Aug 02 | Americas
07 Aug 02 | Middle East
28 Aug 02 | Politics
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Middle East stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Middle East stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes