BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Persian Pashto Turkish French
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Middle East  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Thursday, 18 July, 2002, 10:59 GMT 11:59 UK
'Promises of a future destroyed'
Shiri Negari, 22, was on the doomed 32A bus only because she had missed her normal bus.

Her mother offered to give her a lift to another bus stop in Gilo on the way to taking her younger brother to school.

Shortly after dropping her off, Shiri's mother heard the piercing wails of the ambulances and immediately knew something awful had happened. She turned the car around and returned to the bus stop.







Shiri's father was still at home when he heard a news bulletin announcing the attack. Realising Shiri may have been on the bus, he raced to the site of the bombing.

Her sister, Shelly, a student doctor, heard about the attack from the doctors in the ER unit of the hospital in which she was working. She asked if she could go and help.

Little did she know that her sister would be one of the seriously injured.

Like most Israelis nowadays, she called her family to check everyone was safe.

Shiri, she learnt, was missing.

She was eventually traced to a nearby hospital.

"I ran out of the hospital like a lunatic, with my stethoscope still around my neck. We didn't know how badly injured she was."

The family met up in the hospital. For two hours they waited while the surgeons worked frantically to deal with the severe internal injures caused by the force of the blast.

"It was so terrifying - we didn't know what to expect," another sister Sharon says. "Over the years, we've heard terrible stories about terror attacks - about people leaving hospital without legs or with half a face.

"We didn't dare to think that maybe we would never see our beautiful sister again - that this will be the end."


How can any religion send its people to murder others? How can he think his cause is more important than my sister's life?

Sharon Negari
Shiri was pronounced dead at 10:10 that morning.

Until that day, her family had been busy preparing a surprise party for her birthday the following week. Now they would be saying goodbye.

"When we went in to see her body, she was as lovely as she always had been. Her face was almost unharmed. It was like she was asleep," says Sharon.

Shiri's family describe her as a "special" person who "seemed to radiate an indefinable spiritual quality".

She had just returned from travelling.

The irony, her family says, is that when she was away they feared for her safety and when she announced she was coming home, they worried even more.

"There had been so many terror attacks, my parents didn't really want her to return," says Sharon.

Now they are struggling to come to terms with the fact that the bomber Mohammed al-Ghoul, "destroyed at one blow all the promises that the future held for our Shiri".

"She will never sing again, she will never get married nor have children. We will never hear her laugher - she is gone."


Key stories

Profiles

FACTFILE

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

18 Jul 02 | Middle East
18 Jul 02 | Middle East
18 Jul 02 | Middle East
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Middle East stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Middle East stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes