Page last updated at 07:34 GMT, Thursday, 30 April 2009 08:34 UK

In pictures: 'Safe schools' in Burma

Image copyright Save The Children

Save the Children has supplied material for a "safe school" in Pein Nae Chaung village, built to give better protection from storms.

Image copyright Save The Children

The winds of 140mph (225km/h) destroyed scores of buildings - many of the deaths were caused because people had no safe places to shelter during the storm.

Htun Aung Kyaw (R) - image copyright Save The Children

Htun Aung Kyaw helped to build the new school. He says: "We really need a good strong school like this one, because if there is another Nargis, it won't fall down and people can come shelter here."

Image copyright Save The Children

Extra brackets on the rafters, using screws instead of nails, and extra cross-beams are some of the ways to make schools stronger.

Image copyright Save The Children

Here, a local carpenter finishes off a reinforced window in the new building.

Image copyright Save The Children

Theint Theint Htwe ( left) and her friends draw a map of their village, identifying dangerous low-lying areas so the children will know where to seek shelter if there is another cyclone.

Tin Lin Htun - image copyright Save The Children

Eight-year-old Tin Lin Htun (left) survived the cyclone by clinging to a log. His parents also survived but he lost three siblings.

Image copyright: Save The Children

One year on, an estimated 500,000 people in the Irrawaddy Delta are still living in poor housing that will not stand up to the rainy season. (Images copyright: Tina Salsbury/Save The Children)



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