Page last updated at 17:33 GMT, Tuesday, 17 February 2009

Afghanistan through Soviet eyes

Soviet armoured cars pulling out of Afghanistan, 1989 (image: Alexander Latypov's collection)

It is 20 years since the Soviet army pulled out of Afghanistan after 10 years of war. Soldier Alexander Latypov took photos of the withdrawal. His daughter Nina shared some of them with the BBC.

Soviet troops arrive back from Afghanistan (image: Ilya Abishev)

Ilya Abishev, now a BBC correspondent, served in Afghanistan. His photo shows troops arriving back on Soviet territory, in what is now independent Tajikistan.

Soviet soldiers in Afghanistan (image: Ilya Abishev)

Ilya (here on the left) poses with two Soviet comrades. Exposing a bare torso or even rolling up one's sleeves could cause offence among Afghans, he recalls.

Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin in Kabul, 1 May 1983

Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin brought back photos both of army life and everyday civilian scenes in Afghanistan.

Afghan prisoners (image from Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin's collection, supplied by his son Anton)

Here, a Soviet helicopter stands ready as Afghan prisoners are escorted away (image from Valery Pyatygin's collection).

Soviet armoured cars on an Afghan mountain road (image from Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin's collection, supplied by his son Anton)

A column of Soviet armoured cars snakes around an Afghan mountain road (Valery Pyatygin's collection).

A street scene in Kabul (image from Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin's collection)

A street scene in Kabul of the 1980s (Valery Pyatygin's collection).

A residential area of Kabul (image from Soviet soldier Valery Pyatygin's collection

A residential area of Kabul in the 1980s (Valery Pyatygin's collection).

A wrecked Soviet tank in Afghanistan (image: cqdx)

Some Russians have visited Afghanistan since the fall of the Taleban in 2001. One blogger, cqdx, took this photo of a wrecked Soviet tank.

A mine field in Afghanistan (image: cqdx)

Another image shared by cqdx, who worked in Afghanistan in 2005, shows a mine field. The painted roadside stones signal danger of mines to the left.



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