Page last updated at 14:05 GMT, Tuesday, 9 December 2008

In pictures: Oliver Postgate's career

Oliver Postgate with Bagpuss.

Oliver Postgate was the creator of much-loved children's TV series of the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, including Bagpuss and The Clangers. He has died at the age of 83.

Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin with Bagpuss. Courtesy Smallfilms

Throughout his career, Postgate (l) worked alongside artist and puppeteer Peter Firmin (r). They produced short films – in a disused cowshed in Kent – under the name Smallfilms. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Ivor the Engine in black and white. Courtesy Smallfilms

The first Smallfilms venture - in 1959 - was Ivor the Engine, for ITV. Using simple cardboard cut-outs, it told the story of a Welsh steam engine who wanted to sing in a choir. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Ivor the Engine in black and white. Courtesy Smallfilms

Ivor the Engine, whose friends included station master Dai Station and Ivor’s driver, Edwin Jones, was remade in colour for the BBC in the 1970s. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Noggin the Nog in black and white. Courtesy Smallfilms

Their next production was Noggin the Nog. As with all their adventures, Firmin produced the artwork while Postgate filmed, wrote scripts and provided many of the voices. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

The Clangers. Courtesy Smallfilms

The Clangers, who first appeared on the BBC in 1969, were knitted pink creatures whose voices were created by whistles. They lived on a small moon and salvaged space junk. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Bagpuss. Courtesy Smallfilms

The most popular Smallfilms creation of all was pink-and-white striped cat Bagpuss. First shown in 1974, the 13 episodes of the series were repeated over and over again until 1987. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Professor Yaffle, from Bagpuss. Courtesy Smallfilms

Friends of Bagpuss, who lived in a repair shop, included Professor Yaffle, a mechanical bird with the catchphrase “fiddlesticks and flapdoodle”. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.

Madeleine the rag doll, from Bagpuss. Courtesy Smallfilms

Rag doll Madeleine, who never moved from her wicker chair, told stories, sang songs and acted as a mother figure to the mischievous mice. Pic courtesy Smallfilms.



SEE ALSO
Bagpuss and Ivor creator dies
09 Dec 08 |  Entertainment
Obituary: Oliver Postgate
09 Dec 08 |  Entertainment
Bagpuss poised to make comeback
24 Oct 08 |  Entertainment


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