Page last updated at 00:16 GMT, Wednesday, 12 November 2008

In pictures: Ibrox disaster cards

First postcard being auctioned

In a series of rare postcards depicting ping pong, a German man living in Glasgow described the events at Ibrox in 1902 when a stand collapsed, causing the deaths of 25 people.

Second postcard being auctioned

In the second postcard (address side shown), the sender tells "mummy" he hopes she likes the latest postcards before talking about attending the "big football match".

Third postcard being auctioned

The third postcard describes how people at the front of the stand were crushed against railings and many fainted before the stand collapsed and "spectators fell through the construction".

Fourth postcard being auctioned

The fourth postcard talks of the "terrible confusion" and the crowd surging forward onto the pitch "so that the game was almost totally disrupted". The sender adds that mounted police had to "keep order".

Fifth postcard being auctioned

The fifth postcard describes how one man, who fell 50ft, watched the match to the end but "seemed afterwards to be very ill". The sender also said he would never go to a football match again.

Sixth postcrad being auctioned

The sixth postcard in the series has been added to the lot. It is believed there would have been a sixth card sent home by the German man but that this has since become lost.



SEE ALSO
Postcards describe Ibrox disaster
12 Nov 08 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West


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