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Last Updated: Thursday, 27 September 2007, 15:23 GMT 16:23 UK
In pictures: Israeli youth village

Ethiopians in Yemin Orde (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

About 500 young refugees from at least 20 countries around the world live in the village of Yemin Orde.

Chinese Jewish girl (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

Among the children here are two girls from a tiny community which claims Jewish ancestry in Kaifeng in China.

Adam, resident at Yemin Orde (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

One of the residents, Adam, fled fighting in his village in Darfur. "In my dreams I wanted to be in a place like this. It's changed my life. Now I look to the future," he says.

Brazilian students (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

The children, like this group from Brazil, live together in a series of homes around the village. Boys and girls have separate accommodation.

Counsellor with young girl (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

Resident counsellors in the village to help with any emotional and psychological problems for refugees who have often suffered years of abuse.

Girls outside living quarters (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

The children are given an Israeli education and there are also extra-curricular activities, including sports and a choir.

Sigal Kanotopsky outside Ethiopian gojo (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

Many of the children are Jews from Ethiopia. Some built a traditional Ethiopian hut, or gojo, as a memorial to those who never made it.

Girls (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

The centre strives to create a substitute family environment for the children, most of whom have no parents and arrive here alone.

Children walk during air raid drill (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

The village carries out regular air raid drills involving all the students and staff.

Children (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

Thousands of children have passed through the centre since it was founded in 1953 for orphans from the Holocaust and Jewish refugees from Arab states.

Dr Chaim Peri (right) and former student Gadi (photo and copyright: Noam Sharon atp)

Graduates are allowed to stay on, but even those who leave the village often come back to visit. (Pictures by Noam Sharon, atp)






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