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Last Updated: Friday, 6 April 2007, 06:22 GMT 07:22 UK
In pictures: Coracling on the River Ness

Building a coracle (Pic: Robin Brown)

The start of the building process. The deal seat-section with hazel poles in the ground and willow gunwale woven about them at ground level.

Building a coracle (Pic: Robin Brown)

Where the confusion begins - bending the hazel rods and lashing them into a strong and flexible frame..

Building a coracle (Pic: Robin Brown)

Inside the covered frame with lashed hazel ribs, foot rests and tarred calico.

Carrying the coracle (Pic: Robin Brown)

The coracle is easily transported over land, but does look like a giant turtle's shell.

Coracle on river (Pic: Stefan Brown)

Launching the coracle takes a little bit of practice and a little bit of skill.

Paddling on the River Ness (Pic: Stefan Brown)

There's room to get into your stride while paddling on the River Ness.

Paddling the coracle on the River Ness (Pic: Stefan Brown)

Always persuade a friend - in this case Robin Brown - to use it so you can see how it rides before trying it yourself.

Paddling the coracle on the River Ness (Pic: Stefan Brown)

Mastering the figure-of-eight sculling draw stroke over the broad bow can take a while for some, others can do it instinctively.

Paddling the coracle (Pic: Stefan Brown)

Putting the little boat through its paces while out and about on the river.




SEE ALSO
Snap, coracle and plop on the waves
06 Apr 07 |  Highlands and Islands



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