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Last Updated: Thursday, 7 July 2005, 11:12 GMT 12:12 UK
In pictures: Stubbs the anatomist
Self-Portrait, 1781  By Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London
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George Stubbs (1724 - 1806) is considered the greatest painter of horses in the history of art. Image: By Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London
George Stubbs: Study of Blood Vessels (Lateral), 1756-58  Royal Academy of Arts, London
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His intricate drawings of equine anatomy have led to comparisons with the artist-scientist Leonardo da Vinci. Image: Royal Academy of Arts, London
Whistlejacket, about 1762.  The National Gallery, London
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He is best known for his portraits of horses, such as Whistlejacket, shown here, one of the most popular paintings in the National Gallery. The National Gallery, London
Mares and Foals, 1763-65  Tate 2005
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In honour of Stubbs, the National Gallery is holding a new exhibition of his work, Stubbs and the Horse. The exhibition, which opens on 29 June, features many of his original drawings and previously unseen paintings. Image: Tate 2005
George Stubbs, Study of the Muscles (Anterior), 1756-58  Royal Academy of Arts, London
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Before he became known as a painter, Stubbs spent 18 months dissecting horses and making detailed notes and drawings at a farmhouse in the village of Horkstow, near Hull. Image: Royal Academy of Arts, London
Finished Study for the Third Anatomical Table of the Muscles, 1756-58.  Royal Academy of Arts, London
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Stubbs suspended horses' bodies from the ceiling and made elaborate notes and drawings as he dissected. These were published in his book, The Anatomy of the Horse, in 1766. Image: Royal Academy of Arts, London
Lustre, with a Groom, 1761-62.  Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
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This painting, Lustre, with a Groom, 1761-62, shows the astonishing detail that went into his work. Image: Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
The Duchess of Richmond and Lady George Lennox Watching the Duke's Racehorses at Exercise, 1759-60  The Trustees of the Goodwood Collection
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His portraits pay homage to the golden age of British racing, as new, faster thoroughbred horses were introduced to the racetrack. Image: The Trustees of the Goodwood Collection



SEE ALSO:
Research aims to find racing greats
26 Dec 02 |  Science/Nature
All the grey horses
09 Oct 02 |  Science/Nature
Origins of domestic horse revealed
16 Jul 02 |  Science/Nature


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