BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  In Depth: World: 2001: War on Terror: TV and Radio reports
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
banner Monday, 3 December, 2001, 16:36 GMT
Afghanistan's missing millions
Newly-arrived Afghan refugees set up tents at a refugee camp
Afghanistan has the world's worst refugee problem. Two decades of war and five years of drought have created several million refugees. Aid agencies say the military strikes on Afghanistan is creating many thousands more.

BBC News Online looks at the scale of the crisis and the international response to the problem.


4 February 2002

The hunger battle

Refugees at a camp inside Afghanistan
Refugees at a camp inside Afghanistan

Tens of thousands of Afghans are facing starvation according to international aid agencies trying to get supplies to them. Much of the help never gets beyond the major towns. The problem is worst in the west of the country, in the remote mountain villages north east of Herat.

 The BBC's David Loyn reports


10 December 2001

Rebuilding after decades of war

A large hole caused by a bomb dropped by a United States B-52 bomber plane at Kabul airport
Kabul airport was badly damaged by bombing

The new government will have a tough job rescuing its country from the rubble. With most of Afghanistan's infrastructure in ruins, the cost of rebuilding is expected to run to billions of pounds. It is a mammoth task facing the country's new leaders.

 The BBC's Paul Welsh reports


7 December 2001

UN prepares massive aid operation

Thousands of children are among those going hungry
Thousands of children are among those going hungry

Final preparations are being made in Afghanistan for huge handouts of food aid. About 1.5 million people are due to receive emergency supplies as Kabul struggles to rebuild and the harsh Afghan winter sets in.

 The BBC's Paul Welsh reports


4 December 2001

Going hungry in Afghanistan

The onset of winter means deteriorating conditions
The onset of winter means deteriorating conditions

There may be hope for a more peaceful future, but for now, life in the Afghan capital, Kabul, is still a nightmare for many. The World Food Programme is handing out tokens to be exchanged for food for the thousands of people who are not getting enough to eat.

 The BBC's Clive Myrie reports


20 November 2001

The hidden camps

Thousands of Afghans fled their homes in fear of US bombing
Thousands of Afghans fled their homes in fear of US bombing

For the first time, western journalists have been taken by the Taleban to a refugee camp near Kandahar in southern Afghanistan, where internally displaced people have been accumulating for months.


  The BBC's Matt Frei reports


A child's view

Children are arriving alone at refugee camps
Children are arriving alone at refugee camps

As the situation in Afghanistan gets worse, concern is growing for the children fleeing the country and arriving alone in neighbouring Pakistan. Some have seen their parents killed. Others have been sent away because their families can no longer afford to keep them.


  The BBC's Matthew Price reports


Taleban soldiers push back Afghan refugees at the Pakistan border
Taleban soldiers push back Afghan refugees
Afghan refugees pushed back at border

Hundreds of Afghan refugees attempting to cross into Pakistan at a border crossing near Quetta, have been moved to a camp controlled by the Taleban, six miles inside Afghanistan.

 The BBC's Fergal Keane reports


US food parcels
US food parcels
US food drops to Afghan refugees "a catastrophe"

With at least a hundred thousand refugees having fled Taleban-held areas of Afghanistan, American planes continued dropping food packages. But some of them were being sold in local markets.

 The BBC's Jonathan Charles reports


An Afghan refugee carries a child across the border into Chaman, Pakistan
Afghan refugees illegally cross Pakistan border
Refugees give eye witness accounts of air strikes

As the US bombing campaign in Afghanistan enters its second week refugees start to cross illegally into neighbouring Pakistan. They are bringing with them the first eye-witness accounts of the bombing raids.

 The BBC's Jill McGivering reports.


Pressure grows for pause in air strikes

The United Nations Human Rights Commissioner, Mary Robinson warns that the lives of several million Afghans are at risk unless food and shelter can be delivered to the country before the onset of winter. The work of aid agencies has been made far more difficult since 11 September.

 The BBC's Fergus Walsh reports.


Pakistan 'overwhelmed'

Pakistan is already hosting 2.2m Afghan refugees
Pakistan is already hosting 2.2m Afghan refugees
Millions of refugees depend on food handouts to survive, but with very little aid getting into Afghanistan neighbouring countries risk being swamped. Relief organisations and the United Nations have appealed for urgent help to stave off a catastrophe.

 Click here for Adam Brookes' report


Tajikistan enters equation

One million Tajiks are threatened with starvation
One million Tajiks are threatened with starvation
As Afghans continue to flee in fear of war, thousands of refugees are heading for the border with Tajikistan. However, the former Soviet republic is refusing to let them in because it is struggling to cope with a crisis of its own - widespread hunger caused by a drought.

 Click here for David Shukman's report


Long lasting humanitarian crisis

Afghan crisis: Aid needed for months
Afghan crisis: Aid needed for months
The attacks on America have brought the plight of Afghan refugees to the world's attention, but the problem dates back several years. In February the BBC's Matt Frei was allowed deep into Afghanistan to see conditions at the Herat camp in the west of the country.

 Click here for Matt Frei's report


A new alliance forms

Annan says money may not be enough
Annan says money may not be enough
In addition to the global coalition against terrorism, 15 countries met in Berlin to plan the wider relief effort for refugees. UN Secretary General Kofi Annan called for the international community to provide $584m for the projected needs of up to 7.5m Afghans over the next six months.

 Click here for Emil Petrie's report


March 24 2001

Afghan families move toward the newly established refugee camps at Chaman
New camp for Afghan refugees
UN opens new refugee camp

Pakistan allows the United Nations to open a refugee camp on the Afghanistan border but says it will only admit women, children and the elderly. The Taleban opens a refugee camp for those that Pakistan refuses to let in.

 The BBC's Fergal Keane reports

Links to more TV and Radio reports stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more TV and Radio reports stories