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banner Monday, 1 October, 2001, 15:27 GMT 16:27 UK
The view from the floor
British soldier
Delegates had mixed views on military action
There are mixed feelings among Labour members at the party conference in Brighton over the prospect of anti-terrorist military action - overall Tony Blair's policy is backed, but concerns are not far from the surface.

BBC News Online also tested delegates thinking about the possible introduction of identity cards and the future of government spending commitments in an uncertain economic climate.

Edith McCauley
The local councillor was firmly behind identity cards
Edith McCauley is a local councillor from the London Borough of Merton.

She was convinced that military strikes were necessary if international terrorism was to be stopped and was behind Prime Minister Tony Blair in his efforts.

"I support everything our leader is doing," she said.

On identity cards she said: "It's absolutely necessary that we've got to have ID cards."

Part of her reasoning was to tackle illegal immigration.

"With all these people coming under false pretences we don't know who we're letting in."

Ms McCauley was convinced that Gordon Brown could carry out his spending commitments even with a recession possibly on the way

"I don't think it will be curtailed. We must look after people."

June McMahon
June McMahon wants diplomatic options used to crush terrorism
June McMahon, from Brent East constituency, was extremely anxious at the thought of military strikes in the wake of the attack in New York and Washington.

"We've got to use diplomacy - get everybody involved .

"We've got to crush terrorism but it'll take a long time."

On ID cards she pointed out that they were in use during World War Two.

"I can't see any problems," she said.

On widespread predictions of recession Ms McMahon felt that the media were guilty of talking the nation into economic difficulties.

"But we'll cope if a recession comes along," she said.

Gennice Birkin
Glennice Birkin is worried about PPP
Glennice Birkin from Erewash was worried at the prospect of what she termed a war.

"All diplomatic efforts should be exhausted first," she said.

She was in favour of ID cards however arguing that if you have nothing to hide "you shouldn't be worried".

In terms of the economy, she said it was "essential" to maintain spending levels.

"I am sure that Gordon Brown will find a way but I'm very concerned about plans for public private partnerships."

Selena Strudwick
Selena Strudwick was uncomfortable about ID cards
Selena Strudwick from Haywards Heath expressed scepticism over how effective military action could be.

"It's such a complex issue. I think that perhaps we should be looking for justice and not military action," she said.

She also professed herself "uncomfortable" with the idea of introducing ID cards.

"I can't quite see what good they will do as we already have passports, driving licences and other ID."

On public spending she said she wanted increased direct taxes and a reduction in indirect taxation such as VAT.

Mike Hamilton from Bristol Kingswood was absolutely in favour of a military strike against the Taleban if they continued to harbour the prime suspect behind the US atrocities, Osama Bin Laden.

Mark Hamilton
Sure about military action
"If negotiation fails, and I cannot see that it will succeed, then we will have to take action," he said.

He was also firmly in favour of the introduction of ID cards saying that they would increase security in the UK.

"We've got nothing to fear from their introduction," he said.

On public spending he said that having pledged to invest in public services the government should keep its promises.

"I don't think they would have to put up taxes," he said.

See also:

01 Oct 01 | UK Politics
Brown talks tough on spending
01 Oct 01 | UK Politics
ID card plans under Labour fire
16 Sep 01 | UK Politics
Call for caution over military action
19 Sep 01 | Europe
Germany backs military action
26 Sep 01 | Americas
When will military action begin?
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