Crash: Death on Britain's roads



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Fatalaties by sex

Three times as many males die as females. This is partly a question of greater exposure but other research shows that, even per mile travelled, males are twice as likely to be involved in crashes as females.

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the dayMaleFemaleUnknown
186200
259200
352100
45680
53890
63560
759140
875190
951320
1053260
1161310
1266350
1376360
1470410
1587430
16114410
1798390
18121520
19103170
20103290
2199260
2283260
23100240
2480170

Fatalaties by age

New drivers aged between 17 and 25 stand out. Passing a driving test does not provide the necessary experience and judgments needed for today's busy roads. The hourly distribution has high numbers between 10pm and 2am, implying partying, drinking and lower levels of seat belt use.

Those aged 75 years and older comprise a surprisingly large segment - likely reflecting the greater vulnerability of the human frame as we age. The hourly distribution of the 75+ group is almost the opposite of the 17? to 25-year-old group - almost all in daylight hours.

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the dayUnder 17years old17-25 years old26-35 years old36-45 years old46-55 years old56-65 years old66-75 years old75 and older
1356171171020
21422074410
34291873100
41261967410
5227934200
64109510300
7213201510931
8323141616985
9121815146379
103101610910417
113941999831
124161113168924
13820171413101416
1461710191091624
1522219241316826
161519162017122234
17142115201871328
181223213919131828
1911301521118915
2015372118148811
211140251791166
221238189111155
23449201718466
24448171310113

Fatalaties by weather

With 12% of deaths in the rain and 83% of deaths in fine weather that suggests that weather is not as big a factor as many think. Rain combined with darkness does show higher numbers of deaths.

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the dayFineRainSnowFogOther
17718014
2586015
3454031
4528034
5324002
6306121
7557132
8846023
96410106
106511011
11788013
12878202
138916004
14907126
151178001
1612317007
1711420001
1814328012
199319011
2010517016
219718011
227810115
239920002
247213004

Fatalaties by vehicle

One half are car occupants, mainly distributed between 3 pm and 1am. Contrast that with motorcycle riders where most fatalities are in daylight hours or the early evening. There are three times as many car occupant deaths as motorcycle riders but there are 20 times more cars than motorcycles. Riding a motorcycle is one of the most risky activities in modern life.

Pedestrian deaths are only 14% more than motorcyclist deaths. So, think of the differences in exposure. A surprising number of pedestrians are killed between 11 pm and 7 am. How many people are walking around in the middle of the night? And how many are sober?

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the dayBicycleMotorbikeCarBusGoodsOtherPedestrian
1548522026
2076002016
3054414012
41445010114
503290608
605250527
7511431707
89195248119
95254019116
1081240312119
115234945127
12101948414426
1352653512425
142345446525
1584159211118
165428917237
179337936435
189528457744
199256823333
204288066339
213277727232
225166815131
234198604121
24277213220

Fatalaties by day of the week

The hourly distribution for all groups shows the afternoon and evening commute as high frequency times, reflecting the high volumes of traffic.

Friday, Saturday and Sunday cover 50% of all deaths.

Saturday and Sunday show evening peaks related to the periods following likely pub drinking and parties. On Sunday there are peaks following likely lunchtime drinking.

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the daySundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Saturday
134561010827
21766651020
3135442520
4275454616
5102223613
69660388
75614147139
81016231681210
9518161112127
10116102110119
11149913201213
1213141010142117
131881318211417
142011720102117
1525132018151124
1623171025232722
1717121827173113
1827202321203924
1916162216112211
2018181314232023
2115151512162123
2292097171716
2320171218151920
2489139101921

Fatalaties by road type

The low number of fatalities on motorways stands out. 30% on unclassified roads relates largely to urban streets which have not been classified.

The evening commuting hours stand out particularly on unclassified, C and B roads.

Commentary: Professor Murray Mackay, Professor Emeritus of transport safety, at Birmingham University

Hour of the dayMotorwayA roadB roadC roadUnclassified
1547231041
2639111029
37373714
464614518
55197314
6828248
7539121227
8961111533
9544151936
1035112932
1144814949
12065151048
13862171252
14766191142
151084221243
16483291976
17672271566
188105382074
19566161944
201269231551
2187916641
2284816747
23572221349
24447161335

Download the data as a spreadsheet Microsoft Excel|CSV

See Crash: Special report for more coverage.

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