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EDITIONS
 Budget 2002 Tuesday, 16 April, 2002, 13:38 GMT 14:38 UK
Audio and video coverage
The UK Chancellor Gordon Brown has delivered the first Budget of Labour's second term. As expected the main headline was an increase in National Insurance to pay for increased NHS spending.
Click here to watch all the key moments of the budget speech and opposition reaction:   56k  



Tony Blair speaking to BBC Political Editor Andrew Marr
Tony Blair says he is 100% confident the NHS will deliver
Tony Blair says he is confident that raising more tax to pay for improvements to the NHS is the right thing to do. And he told the BBC Political Editor, Andrew Marr that pledges would be met including a maximum six month waiting time.

  Click here to watch

Gordon Brown and Tony Blair
Brown and Blair: the hard sell
On the day after the budget Gordon Brown and Tony Blair met health workers in London. Despite the cash boost for the NHS they still faced some tough questions.

  The BBC's John Pienaar reports.


Gordon Brown delivers his Budget
Gordon Brown delivers his Budget
The chancellor has set out his plans to raise National Insurance and boost funds for the NHS. But the Conservatives accused him of breaking election pledges on not raising taxes, and the Liberal Democrats said the measures were long overdue.

  The BBC's John Pienaar reports.

How soon will nurses notice the difference?
Nurses at a child's bedside

Spending on the NHS is due to top 100 billion in five years' time. Many more doctors and nurses are needed to staff hospitals - so how long will it be before the increases in spending produce the desired results for patients?

  The BBC's Niall Dickson reports.

Who will be the winners and losers?
Who will be the winners and losers?

Most people will be hit by a rise in National Insurance. Anyone earning more than 4,600 a year will pay more, and those without children will pay most heavily. What will the Budget mean for low, middle and high earners?

  The BBC's Laura Trevelyan reports.

Morning commuters leaving a train
Every worker will contribute more to health services

Businesses are calling the National Insurance increase a tax on jobs. The chancellor is being accused of giving with one hand and taking away with the other. The criticism comes despite a series of measures to help small businesses.

  The BBC's Rory Cellan Jones reports.

A pint glass
Paying less for your pint

For once, the Budget is good news for drinkers, or at least those who favour real ale. Duty on beer produced by independent breweries will be halved in time for the World Cup.

  The BBC's Ben McCarthy reports.

Working Lunch logo

Adrian Chiles and the Working Lunch team are joined by specialist analysts who answered viewers' questions immediately after the budget speech.

  Click here to watch the programme in full  


Click below to watch the chancellor's autumn pre-Budget speech, in which he outlined his approach to this spring's Budget and set out his economic forecasts:   56k


Key stories

Analysis

QUIZ

BUDGET DIARIES

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
Links to more Budget 2002 stories are at the foot of the page.


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Links to more Budget 2002 stories

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