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2006 World Cup decision Thursday, 29 June, 2000, 15:57 GMT 16:57 UK
Stadium guide: Wembley revamped
An artist's impression of the new Wembley stadium
An artist's impression of the new Wembley stadium
England's stadiums are the jewel in the crown of their bid. No expense will be spared on making the new Wembley the greatest stadium in the world.

The budget is 475m and when completed it will have a capacity of 90,000. Some of the history will be lost - the Twin Towers for a start - but far more will be gained by rebuilding what has become an inadequate home for a major international side.

There has been a revolution in England's football grounds since the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 and the country is now brimming with first-rate stadiums.

Old Trafford is currently the biggest club ground in England with a capacity of over 61,000. However, by the time 2006 rolls round the ground will hold 68,400.

Manchester United's 'Theatre of Dreams'
Manchester United's 'Theatre of Dreams'
A capacity of 60,000 is the minimum requirement for a ground to host the opening match, a semi-final or a final and Sunderland's Stadium of Light, although only opened with a 42,000 capacity in 1997, will be increased to hold 63,000 by the time of the 2006 World Cup.

Arsenal and Liverpool both also have current proposals to build stadiums that would house more than 60,000 people.

Villa Park and St James' Park will both be refurbished to produce grounds to hold more than 50,000 spectators while the 90m City of Manchester Stadium which is being built for the 2002 Commonwealth Games will become home to Manchester City with a 48,000 capacity.

England would then be able to choose from a number of other stadiums all able to seat more than 40,000 - including Goodison Park, Stamford Bridge, Pride Park, Hillsborough, the Riverside Stadium, and newly-planned stadiums in Coventry and Leicester.

English stadiums also have the added benefit of having the crowd very close the pitch, ensuring a fantastic atmosphere, and there are no fences to obstruct the view.

See also:

29 Jun 00 | 2006 World Cup decision
29 Jun 00 | 2006 World Cup decision
Links to more 2006 World Cup decision stories are at the foot of the page.


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