BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: In Depth: Unions 2000  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Unions 2000 Tuesday, 25 April, 2000, 17:22 GMT 18:22 UK
School inspections 'destroy' teachers
sue rogers
Sue Rogers: Suffered after inspection
By Alison Stenlake at the NASUWT conference in Llandudno

Teachers have launched a vigorous attack on the system for inspecting schools in England.

Delegates attending the annual conference of the National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers (NASUWT) said the current system, under the Office for Standards in Education, was "destroying" teachers.

They are calling for school inspectors to help improve the schools they criticise, instead of "coming in, inspecting and running".

They resolved to take it up with the Education Secretary, David Blunkett, other Department for Education officials, and Ofsted itself.

A report presented to the conference in Llandudno stated that the NASUWT was "not opposed to an inspection process".

But it said the process should be "supportive as well as inspectorial" as it was under the system which Ofsted replaced.

It added: "Ofsted sometimes has the effect of reducing teaching to a mechanical process in which enthusiasm, and indeed, inspiration both from teachers and pupils are taken out of the equation."

Appeals procedure

Among other changes the union says should be made are using a permanent group of professional inspectors with "recent and relevant experience of teaching", introducing an independent body to which Ofsted - "or any successor" - would be accountable, and setting up an independent appeals procedure.

NASUWT national executive member Terry Bladen said that under the current system, teachers were being "destroyed" by people who had not taught for 15 or 20 years, and who had not taught the national curriculum.

"We don't want people who come in, make stupid comments, look for problems, and if they can't find one, manufacture one.

"What should happen is that they come in and work with the schools, work with the local authorities, to make changes - but the majority of them are not capable of doing that.

"We need to go back to the days when we had inspectors who knew what they were doing."

National executive member Sue Rogers described how the stress of undergoing an Ofsted inspection had caused a slight eczema condition on her wrist to spread to her arms, chest and face.

Chris Lines, another executive member, said that in many European countries, inspections focused on institutions, rather than teachers.

"We can't go on with this system of blame and fear," he said, describing it as an "economic waste", as teachers were coming into the profession then leaving after four or five years, "destroyed" by Ofsted.

See also:

17 Apr 00 | Unions 2000
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Unions 2000 stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Unions 2000 stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes