BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: In Depth: Taiwan Election  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Taiwan Election Friday, 3 March, 2000, 11:26 GMT
Li Ao: Outspoken outsider
Li Ao was the outsider in Taiwan's presidential election who freely admitted he had no chance of winning.

Historian, chat show personality and political satirist, Li is a veteran opposition figure who has spent a number of years in jail for his political views and has been nominated for the Nobel Prize in literature.

Imprisoned at one time for being a "Taiwan independence element" - a charge he still vehemently denies - Li teamed up with the pro-reunification New Party for the elections.

He is widely known around Taiwan, not least for his colourful private life - he married a popular Taiwanese movie actress, has had two affairs with married women and got married for a second time to a woman 30 years his junior.
Factfile
Age: 64
Party: New Party
Political experience: Satirist and social commentator; former political prisoner
Running mate: Elmer Feng (pro-unification legislator chosen by New Party )
Born in the mainland province of Harbin in 1935, Li argues that reunification with the mainland is inevitable but that Taiwan should be equal not subordinate to Beijing.

He says Taiwan should negotiate with China and abandon its policy of attaining international recognition as the government of all of China.

Li is expected to gain most support from older, mainland-born Taiwan citizens who favour reunification with China.

Outside that relatively small group, Li's campaign has so far failed to strike much of a chord with the electorate and his popularity rating rarely scales above the 1% mark.

Undeterred, Li admits that his primary goal is not to win the presidency, but to use the campaign as stage upon which to publicise his often outspoken views.

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Taiwan Election stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Taiwan Election stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes