BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: In Depth: US Elections: Glossary: A-B
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

banner Sunday, 20 February, 2000, 17:05 GMT
Buckley v. Valeo
Supreme Court
The Supreme Court ruled restrictions on political funding were unconstitutional
The 1976 Supreme Court decision allowing unlimited spending by individuals or groups who are not standing for election themselves but who wish to support or oppose particular candidates.

The provision does not apply to contributiuons made by corporations or unions and rules that in any donor situation there must be no co-ordination or consultation with any candidate.

For example any individual or lobby group can decide to spend $5 million running advertisements telling people not to vote for candidate X, so long as they do not talk to candidate Y's party or any other party or candidate.

The court's decision effectively overruled two major parts of the 1974 Federal Election Campaign Act which imposed mandatory spending limits on all federal races, and limited independent spending on behalf of federal candidates.

The court ruled that such restrictions violated an individual's First Amendment rights to freedom of expression.

This is because limits on spending "necessarily reduces the quantity of expression by restricting the number of issues discussed, the depth of their exploration, and the size of the audience reached."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE

Inauguration:

Bush presidency:

PICTURE GALLERIES

Texts and transcripts:

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
A to Z
See also:

22 Feb 00 | G-I
Hard money
22 Feb 00 | Q-S
Soft money
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more A-B stories are at the foot of the page.


Links to more A-B stories