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EDITIONS
Thursday, 1 February, 2001, 12:54 GMT
All the world's a stage
Artist's impression in courtroom
The trial unfolded to a global audience
The prosecution team was led by the Lord Advocate, Colin Boyd QC.

He was appointed to the post of Scotland's senior law officer after the sudden resignation of Lord Hardie QC, in February this year.

Until then, Mr Boyd was solicitor-general, a post he had held since 1997.

He had been heavily involved in preparing the prosecution case for the Lockerbie trial.

Lord Advocate, Colin Boyd QC
Lord Advocate, Colin Boyd QC
Mr Boyd graduated BA from Manchester University and LLB (Hons) from the University of Edinburgh.

He worked as a solicitor from 1978-82 and was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1983.

He served as advocate-depute from 1993-95 and was appointed QC in 1995.

Mr Boyd is a legal associate of the Royal Town Planning Institute and contributed to "The Legal Aspects of Devolution", published before the 1997 general election.

BBC Scotland's home affairs correspondent Reevel Alderson, who has watched a large amount of the trial, writes:

Open quote

The Lord Advocate's economical style with non-contentious witnesses caused the prosecution to run out of witnesses on the first day.

Since then, he has not led any evidence, but has appeared in court on a number of occasions to advise the judges on matters arising outwith the proceedings.

He described an article in The Sunday Herald about the conduct of the trial as "lamentable journalism" and informed the judges about the arrival, five months into the case, of new documentary evidence, later revealed to have been in the hands of the Syrians.

Close quote


Alastair Campbell QC is one of the prosecution lawyers.

Mr Campbell became home advocate-depute in 1997.

He graduated MA from the University of Aberdeen and LLB from the University of Strathclyde.

He worked in the procurator-fiscal's office from 1979-84 and was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1985, becoming a QC in 1995.

Mr Campbell was also admitted to the English Bar in 1990.

He was an advocate-depute from 1990-93 and a standing junior counsel in Scotland to HM Customs and Excise in 1995.

In 1996, he was a member of the Criminal Justice Forum and the following year, sat on the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board.

Our correspondent writes:

Open quote

He closed the Crown case with a speech to the judges taking just over a day to summarise the evidence of the previous 79.

He served as a procurator fiscal before being admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1985 and was appointed QC 10 years later.

The son of a Church of Scotland minister, he resembles one himself with an apparently humourless demeanour and occasionally arcane pronunciations.

He appears constantly well-prepared and able to deal easily in a quiet undemonstrative way with legal objections and interventions from the bench.

Close quote


Allan Turnbull QC was part of the prosecution team.

Open quote

He took the lead in several of the chapters of the Crown evidence, most notably the examination of the Swiss arms dealer Edwin Bollier, says our correspondent.

Normally a prosecution witness can be guaranteed a relatively easy time from prosecution lawyers.

Quietly and unobtrusively Mr Turnbull allowed Mr Bollier to tell the court a string of incredible stories denying any involvement in the bomb plot.

But with a series of questions - described by one legal observer as 'masterly' - Mr Bollier was trapped into the admission that his company had manufactured the timer which had detonated the Pan Am bomb.

Mr Turnbull was appointed to the Scottish Bar in 1982 and took silk in 1996. When the trial is complete, he will become the Home Advocate Depute, the Crown's senior prosecutor.

Close quote


The defence lawyers are William Taylor QC, who represents Al Megrahi.

Mr Taylor was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1971 and the English Bar in 1990.

William Taylor QC
William Taylor QC
He was appointed a QC in Scotland in 1986 and a QC in England in 1998.

He graduated MA LLB (Hons) from Aberdeen University and served as a councillor in the Edinburgh Corporation from 1973-75, then on Lothian Regional Council from 1974-92.

Mr Taylor has been a temporary sheriff, a member of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board and has served as standing junior counsel for the Foreign Office and the Department of Health and Social Security.

He has specialised in criminal defence work since the 1980s.

Our correspondent observes:

Open quote

An experienced criminal defence lawyer, he took a mammoth five days to deliver his final submissions to the judges.

His cross-examination of one of the prosecution witnesses, the Libyan double-agent, Abdul Majid Giaka, was extremely hostile.

Yet in addressing the Bench, Mr Taylor frequently adopted a highly deferential tone, on one occasion reminding them that he always approached them 'as a supplicant'.

He coined one of the catchphrases of the trial, characterising his frequent legal arguments as "plump and plain".

Close quote


Richard Keen QC represented Fhimah.

Richard Keen QC
Richard Keen QC
Mr Keen was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1980 and was appointed QC in 1993.

He graduated LLB (Hons) from the University of Edinburgh where he was a Beckman scholar.

He served as standing junior counsel in Scotland to the Department of Trade and Industry from 1986-93 and is chairman of the appeals committee, Institute of Chartered Accountants in Scotland.

Open quote

He had little experience in criminal work. He was admitted to the Bar in 1980, taking silk in 1993, notes our correspondent.

His legal arguments were always presented meticulously; his final submissions took less than a day.

But his performance whilst cross-examining witnesses was more showy as he spoke towards the judges while asking telling questions.

His wit is acerbic. He asked the Libyan witness Giaka, who now lives in the USA, if he had heard of a fictional character named "Mitty, first name Walter".

When Edwin Bollier told a fantastic tale of a mystery man ordering him to take a letter to the American embassy in Austria Mr Keen asked him if, as he walked into the streets in Vienna, he had heard the sound of zither music.

Close quote

Lockerbie megapuff graphic

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