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Last Updated: Wednesday, 6 December 2006, 13:30 GMT
School Day 24: India-Tanzania-UK
Presenter Julian Keane with children from London school

The World Today on the BBC World Service linked students at schools in Tanzania, India and the UK.

They covered many subjects including marriage, and terrorism.

Pupils came from the Kendriya Vidyalaya Central School in Delhi, the Loyola Secondary School in Dar es Salaam and the Islington Arts and Media School in north London.

Pupils from all three schools discuss marriage in their culture

Abha, Kendriya Vidyalaya Central School, Delhi: In India there are many religions and in developed and educated areas such as Delhi, marriages across religion are encouraged and accepted but in rural areas marriages across religions cause a lot of conflict and many fights between families.

Children from the Loyola Secondary School
Children from Dar es Salaam took part...
Shobit, Kendriya Vidyalaya Central School, Delhi: I'd like to mention that the majority of marriages in India are arranged. This is a very traditional practice that has been carrying on for a very long time. A lot of things are involved but I would like to direct a question to London. Would you consider marrying a boyfriend or girlfriend of a different colour or race?

Mohammed, 13, Islington Arts and Media School, London: I'm a Muslim and if I had a girlfriend and she was not a Muslim and I wanted to marry her I would have to convert her to Islam. If I didn't do that I can't marry her.

Dhabya, Islington Arts and Media School, London: I don't think it's so much about race or colour. In London we live in a democracy and most people can do what they want. It doesn't matter about the colour. For me it's the religion. I'm a Muslim girl and I can't marry someone who isn't a Muslim. A man can marry from other faiths but I cannot.

Jenny, Islington Arts and Media School, London: My family are Christian but I can marry whoever I want. Colour or religion don't matter - there are no limits.

Rebecca, Islington Arts and Media School, London: That's the same with me. Whoever I fall in love with is fine.

John, Loyola Secondary School, Dar es Salaam: I would like to ask Rebecca in London a question: How would your parents take it if you decide to come to Africa and marry someone?

Rebecca, Islington Arts and Media School, London: I think they'd be fine. They wouldn't care who I married it's just that if you move to Africa that's kind of a long way from London.

Pupils from all three schools talk about terrorism and Iraq

Children from the Delhi school
... as well as their counterparts in Delhi
Jennifer, Loyola Secondary School, Dar es Salaam: The kind of picture that I have is of fear - fear of peace and comfort. When such things happen it tends to affect being able to travel. If I wanted to go to the US to study I would feel that it is not peaceful there.

We also have doubts about the United Nations who are meant to enable peace but then they don't have the guts to control the US, while they have the guts to control other countries. It's totally unfair.

Mohammed, 13, Islington Arts and Media School, London: I think George Bush is in the wrong because before Iraq was a nice peaceful country but Saddam was doing really wrong things. But now that the US has gone into Iraq he's torn the county apart.

Now there are bomb blasts, people dying every day. There's car explosions and before in Iraq they had one of the best medical centres in the Middle East but the US has destroyed the country, torn it apart. There's no unity and all the communities are fighting with each other.

Trinity, Islington Arts and Media School, London: Jennifer said that she wants to go to the US but she's scared. Well in my opinion it's the safest country in the world. Just because you are at war doesn't mean your country becomes unsafe.

Anish, Kendriya Vidyalaya Central School, Delhi: I feel the United States has no right to police the world like this. It should mind its own business.


VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
Students from Tanzania, UK and India discuss Iraq



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