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EDITIONS
Euthanasia Tuesday, 28 November, 2000, 11:18 GMT
The pro-life view
old person
The alliance believes people should die naturally
A personal view by Mike Willis, chairman of the Pro-Life Alliance

The drive for legalised euthanasia shares common roots with the legalisation of abortion in 1967.

Promoters of these practices take a utilitarian view of human life rather than viewing all human life as uniquely created and deserving of absolute respect.

We know that in order to legalise abortion, individuals began by breaking the law in order to change it.

The GMC case of Dr Ken Taylor and the trial of Dr David Moor are cases in point.

Softening process

We are being "softened-up" by these heart-rending cases in order to achieve a change in the law.

The Pro-Life Alliance contested the Scottish Parliamentary elections on this specific point of stopping the introduction of euthanasia - or, more correctly, the intentional killing of the sick, the elderly and the infirm.

The PLA supports the extension of large-scale funding of hospices that provide care for terminally-ill adults, children and infants.

The science of pain relief within the hospice movement provides the opportunity for dignified death rather than the starving and dehydrating to death via so-called passive euthanasia.

This was the sad fate of Dr Taylor's patient Mary Ormerod. She died of thirst after 40 days of neglect.

Warning from history

Dr Christopher Hufeland, Goethe's doctor, warned in 1806 "The physician should and may do nothing else but preserve life.

"Whether it is valuable or not, that is none of his business. If he once permits such considerations to influence his actions, the doctor will become the most dangerous man in the state."

The legalising of intentional killing is the catalyst for the wholesale destruction of the elderly - we have seen the torrent of death in Holland where the elderly are terrified of entering hospital for fear of involuntary euthanasia.

The barbarians are inside the walls. The elderly will go the same way as the unborn - unwanted, useless bread gobblers - but who will be next?

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