Page last updated at 10:13 GMT, Friday, 10 October 2008 11:13 UK

Women 'put celebrity over health'

Breast examination
Over 45,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year

Women are more interested in the cult of celebrity than their own health, a charity claims.

A Breast Cancer Campaign poll of 1,000 women found that nearly four out of five women could name Coleen McLoughlin as footballer Wayne Rooney's wife.

However, just over half said they checked their breast for lumps once a month or more.

And the survey showed there was a particular lack of awareness among older women.

While women are clued up about the latest gossip from celeb-land, it appears they are dismissing serious information that could save lives
Arlene Wilkie, of Breast Cancer Campaign

Despite being in one of the age groups most at risk, more than 40% of women aged over 65 did not believe they were at risk from breast cancer, the survey showed.

The reality is that 80% of the breast cancers are diagnosed in women over 50 years old.

In total, just 55% of women checked their breasts at least once a month, 28% only did it a few times a month and 15% said they never did.

Arlene Wilkie, director of research and policy at Breast Cancer Campaign, said: "While women are clued up about the latest gossip from celeb-land, it appears they are dismissing serious information that could save lives.

"More than 45,500 women in the UK are diagnosed with breast cancer every year and we know that early diagnosis gives the best possible chance of survival."




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