Page last updated at 10:59 GMT, Tuesday, 3 June 2008 11:59 UK

Physiotherapists reject pay offer

Physiotherapist
Physiotherapists overwhelmingly rejected the deal

Physiotherapists have become the latest group of health workers to reject the government's three-year pay offer.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, which represents 25,000 specialists, said 98% of its members had voted against the offer.

The package offered by the government would see pay rise by just under 8% over three years.

However, it has already been rejected by health sector unions Unite, the GMB, and the Royal College of Midwives.

At a time of increased economic uncertainty, and with inflation rising, a multi-year offer which represents a real-terms pay cut year on year is not acceptable
Peter Finch
Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

It is the first time in 12 years that the CSP, which represents physiotherapists, assistants and technical instructors, has balloted its members.

Peter Finch, assistant director of employment relations at the CSP, said: "Our members have given a very clear message to the government and NHS employers that the three-year deal is not good enough.

"At a time of increased economic uncertainty, and with inflation rising, a multi-year offer which represents a real-terms pay cut year on year is not acceptable."

The society's national committee will meet on 11 June to decide the next move, in consultation with other NHS unions.

The biggest health workers' union, Unison, will announce the result of its ballot on the pay offer at the end of the week.


SEE ALSO
Health workers reject pay offer
30 May 08 |  Health

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